How much should you care?

A couple of weeks ago, I recorded a podcast with Paul O’Connor and Dana Gardner. Paul O is someone I’ve worked with on and off for about four years now, first as he helped customers Podcast iconnavigate SOA and now as he leads their thinking in Cloud. It was immense fun recording the podcast with Paul, but, if anything, we only scratched the surface of Paul’s thinking. He is one of the real visionaries of how Cloud is going to affect large businesses IT and completely rewire it.

Paul O believes that the end-game of true cloud computing is the ability for a business to completely focus on the business and have the IT from infrastructure to development completely available as a Service. Paul calls this the Grand Unified Theory of Cloud: consuming IT entirely as a service.

I personally don’t agree: I think that there needs to be a sliding line that divides IT from the pieces I have to care about to the pieces I don’t. Twenty years ago I cared about processor instruction sets and assembly code. Today I don’t. Today, I don’t care what actual hardware my Amazon images run under — there is a rough measure and the details don’t bother me. On the other hand, if I was doing algorithmic trading, I care even about the clock frequency I can rack the machine up to. I don’t believe that we will ever get to a line where the business doesn’t care about any of the details — that simply opens up an opportunity for another business to find competitive advantage by finding something to care about. But I do agree with Paul: at the moment we are forced to care about too many aspects.

Here at WSO2 we are trying to create a platform where you can stop caring about 99% of the middleware issues and we can provide a platform that just takes care of that for you. The real Grand Unified Theory of Cloud for me is being able to choose exactly what to care and focus on in your IT, and have the other parts just work — as a service.

Find the full podcast and transcript here.

Paul Fremantle, WSO2 CTO

Paul’s blog: http://pzf.fremantle.org/