Capgemini, WSO2 and the new UN ecosystem

Ibrahim Khalili is a system integration analyst at Capgemini, a multinational that’s one of the world’s foremost providers of management consulting, technology and outsourcing. Headquartered in Paris, Capgemini has been running since 1967, and now makes over 11 billion EUR in revenue.

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Capgemini and WSO2 have a history of working together. One of Capgemini’s recent projects was for the United Nations – to build a new reference architecture for UN agencies to function across a connected technology platform. Khalili, speaking at WSO2Con Asia 2016 in Colombo, Sri Lanka, outlined the three major goals of the new platform.

Whatever they designed had to allow beneficiaries, donors, citizens and the UN’s increasingly mobile workforce to access the functionality and information of agencies regardless at “anywhere, anytime, on any device”; it had to handle information, people and devices in a much smarter and more cost-efficient way that the UN was doing already. It also had to break out the data and bring the UN’s agencies into the world of an API ecosystem.

To put this into finer context, we’re talking about a system that can handle assets, finances, information and humans across a diverse array of agencies – including the nitty gritty of fundraising, running initiatives, and reporting that are key to most UN operations. What they required was what Khalili calls a “platform enabled agency” – more or less a complete update to operational infrastructure, with APIs exposing services, information, and functionality across the board.

Their solution starts with an integration layer that connects to all legacy systems, providing a view of all the data that can be managed. On top of that goes the process layer, which contains the functionality, and on top an API layer exposing the platform’s services and data.

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Once the logical framework was done, Capgemini started filling it in. At the very bottom go IaaS services like VMWare. On top of that comes an ERP universe of sorts – functionality from SugarCRM, Talend, WSO2 Application Server, WSO2 Complex Event Processor, and others, connected by the WSO2 ESB. WSO2 Enterprise Mobility Manager, WSO2 API Manager, and WSO2 User Engagement Server face outwards, allowing this functionality to be used. WSO2 Identity Server wraps around the entire platform, handling ID and authentication.

 

That gives Capgemini – and the UN – not only a cleaner, layered architecture, but one that brings in better scalability as well as a Devops approach. But above all, the chief advantage, says Khalili, is that it’s also open source. With WSO2 products, Capgemini has complete freedom to customize, take apart or rebuild whatever’s required to make a better platform. There’s no stopping innovation.

Capgemini’s not the only one who can leverage our technology. All WSO2 products are free and open source.

Go to http://wso2.com/products/ to download and use any part of our middleware platform. For more information on Capgemini’s solution for the UN, watch Ibrahim Khalili’s full presentation at WSO2Con here.