Eurecat: using iBeacons, WSO2 and IoT for a better shopping experience

Eurecat, based in Catalonia, Spain, is in the business of providing technology. A multinational team of researchers and technologists spread their efforts into technology services, consulting and R&D across sectors ranging from Agriculture to Textiles to the Aerospace industry. By default, this requires them to work in the space of Big Data, cloud services, mobile and the Internet of Things.

One of their projects happened to involve iBeacons in a store. In addition to transmitting messages, the low-energy, cross-platform Bluetooth BLE-based sensors can detect the distance between a potential user and themselves – and transmit this information as ‘frames’. Using this functionality, a customer walking outside the store would be detected and contacted via an automated message.

image00

Upon arriving at the entrance to the store, the customer would be detected by beacons at the front of the shop (near) and at the back of the shop (far). This event itself would be a trigger for the system – perhaps a notification for a store clerk to attend to the customer who just walked in. The possibilities aren’t limited to these use cases: with the combination of different positions and detection patterns, many other events can be triggered or messages pushed.

To implement this, Eurecat architected the system thusly.

image01

The process is set in motion by the iBeacon, which keeps broadcasting frames. These are picked up by the smartphone, which contacts the business services. Complex Event processing would occur here to sort through all these low-level events in real-time. The bus then funnels this data to where it needs to go – notification services, third parties, interfaces and databases.

The WSO2 Complex Event Processor (CEP) and the WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) fit in readily, with the ESB collecting the events and passing them on to the processing layer.

image02

Jordi Roda of Eurecat, speaking at WSO2Con EU 2015, detailed why they choose to go with WSO2: the real-time processing capabilities of CEP, the array of protocols and data formats it can handle, and the Siddhi language, which enabled them to easily construct the queries that would sift through the events. The ESB, said Jordi, they selected because of its performance, security and connectivity it offered.

At the time of speaking, Eurecat had improvements pending: data analytics, a wifi-based location service, better security and scalability.

image03

At WSO2, we’re delighted to be a part of Eurecat’s success – and if your project leads you along similar paths, we’d like to hear from you. Contact us.[a] If you’d like to try us out before you talk to us, our products are 100% free and open source – click here to explore the WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus or here to visit the WSO2 Complex Event Processor.