Tag Archives: middleware

WSO2Con EU 2016: London, and What We Did There

Every so often, London gets to deal with us.

And by us, we mean WSO2 and all of our fantastic clients from all over Europe: people implementing solutions large and small at the cutting edge of enterprise tech and government.

Thus, WSO2Con EU, 2016:  three days of pure WSO2 at the Park Plaza Riverbank Hotel, London. We’d set up a pretty fancy stage and made sure we had a good 1:1 ratio between wine-glasses and presentations. Our sponsors from all across Europe – Yenlo, Chakray, Emoxa, Profesia, RealDolmen, Avintis, iEOLLODEV and Redpill – had joined us at their booths, and all was good…

The tutorials

It’s tradition that the first day houses all of our tutorials. Park Plaza’s curiously labelled Floor -4 (there’s no -3) became home to four color-coded tracks conducted by our experts, with a little bit of mad science happening in the background.

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At our last conference (Asia), we saw quite a lot of interest in microservices and IoT: this time it was integration and analytics that pulled the majority of the crowd – perhaps this had a lot to with the fact that we’re making some pretty big changes and product reveals in these spaces.

The keynotes

Our conferences typically begin with keynotes and shift to a series of topical tracks, including one workshop especially for our partners.

But you need a proper opening act to start off with – and this time it was Box 9 Drumline; the energetic UK-based drummers provided the perfect beat to get everyone awake and ready for WSO2’s founder, CEO and Chief Architect, Dr Sanjiva Weerawarana.

Sanjiva’s keynote touched not just on how WSO2 really works, but also everything new: our new approach to product delivery, for instance, where product, tooling and analytics are equally important; our plans for Carbon 5, the next generation of the underlying foundation on which all our products are built; where we stand on the microservices hype; and how everything we’re doing helps our customers adapt and keep evolving in a digital world.

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There is, he explained, a whole spectrum of digital readiness within organizations. Some companies are born and bred in digital: others are moving up the cycle in stages – starting with problems like ‘I’d like this application connected to this data store’ to ‘how to we give this functionality to our customers?’

And regardless of whatever level of readiness a company finds itself in, he pointed out, introducing the newest changes to our platform, WSO2 is ready to work with them.

The second keynote was by Nigel Fenwick, a VP and Principal Analyst of Forrester. Forrester’s grown immensely since their first report in 1983, and Nigel’s speech, which outlined how companies actually deal with the challenges of going digital, was a clear illustration of the staggering amount of insight they’ve gained in this industry. Less than 20% of companies, he explained, have the right tech to go digital proper in the first place, a problem exacerbated by tacky bolt-on approaches to the problem. It’s a problem of leadership as much as it is of tech. Leaders who truly do understand digital are able to transform into Digital Predators, leading the curve and disrupting how their businesses deliver value to customers.

The third for the day, before we broke off for our multi-track speeches, was Isabelle Mauny, WSO2’s VP of Product Strategy. Isabelle touched on a critical point of today’s business world: customers are no longer satisfied with generic services: decades of personalized search and the likes of social media have led us to expect services that are automatically tailored to our needs. That’s where Big Data and analytics really come in. With WSO2’s analytics platform, not only are we now capable of building services at scale: we’re becoming better and better at identifying what people actually want and adapting – also at scale.

We greeted the end of day three wrapped up with two more keynotes and two panel discussions. Venura Mendis, CTO of WSO2.Telco, a joint venture between WSO2 and Axiata, explaining WSO2.Telco’s vision for telecommunications companies fighting in a digital world; there was Asanka Abeysinghe, WSO2’s VP of Solutions Architecture, explaining how one goes about building a digital enterprise – including what being digital and being connected means in the context of each industry, drawing from the wealth of solutions we’ve built with customers to discuss everything from transport to wearables to architecture.

To those of you who missed out on the keynotes, fear not: they’re recorded and available at eu16.wso2con.com/videos.

The sessions

And was that it? Hardly.

Our conference played out over two levels of the Park Plaza Riverbank, London. In between the keynotes, we had four tracks running constantly, ranging from Integration to Analytics to Strategy to Governance, where our experts talked about the old and the new of the WSO2 platform and our customers and partners shared their stories and insight with what they’ve done. Yenlo even wrote a blogpost from within the conference itself.

tutorials

What does Carbon 5 mean for customers? The new IoT server: how do you leverage that? Where is Data Analytics Server headed? What’s the best way to approach microservices? All of this and more were discussed within these halls.

And of course, we had epic music to wind down to …

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We socialized …

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And of course, we had food.

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Because food is important and you can’t integrate stuff on an empty stomach. Our partners agreed with us: Yenlo, who were among our sponsors, brought along a whopping 80 kilograms of candy to distribute to all and sundry. Yes. Free.

All in all, it was three days of pure, undiluted WSO2 in front of the Thames. 55 glorious sessions, 56 speakers, 5 keynotes and 2 parties to boot: experts from all over Europe converging into one single location to share stories you’d never find elsewhere.

Don’t worry – we’ve not let it go unrecorded. Over the next couple of weeks, we’ll be uploading all the videos to our conference videos list, our YouTube channel and putting up the slides from the presentations  on Slideshare.

WSO2Con Insights: How WSO2’s Open Source API Management Platform is Enabling BNY Mellon’s Digital Transformation

Let’s talk numbers. Bank of New York Mellon (BNY Mellon) runs a set of systems that track up to USD 30 trillion worth of wealth globally through investment management, investment services and wealth management. That’s about a quarter of all the world’s wealth of private assets, assets under management and assets under custody and/or administration.

When it comes to technology numbers, BNY Mellon operates a private cloud out of their own data centers, and has about 900 projects going on at any moment in time, run and managed smoothly by a 13,000 strong team.

During his talk at WSO2Con USA 2015, Michael Gardner, managing director and Head of the BNY Mellon Innovation Center explained how these numbers converged into creating the NEXEN digital ecosystem powered by WSO2’s API management platform, to transform the financial services industry.

The path of the open source code

Software driven disruption is impacting every company in every industry, Gardner noted, and the only way to survive is to keep moving in the same velocity, ability and agility as technology itself. Companies have evolved from mere ecommerce-related online retailers to managing entire customer relationships, to complete supply chain management and today, to digitized business operations. Such a company, according research firm Gartner, is defined as a ‘digital enterprise’.

Gardner noted that it’s critical for BNY Mellon to be a digital enterprise, to have the ability to accept new technologies and adapt, pushing very hard on it’s digital transformation and doing so by converging various technologies. He then went on to express why open source is now the center of their focus in this transformation.

“Open Source is very very important to us,” Gardner said. “We believe that open source is the future of enterprise collaboration. It’s not because it’s free. That’s great… but it (open source) becomes the basis for enterprises to collaborate together to evolve software mutually in ways that they need.”

The NEXEN digital ecosystem

BNY Mellon is bringing a collection of progressive software projects and technologies together, with an API program that enables the digital transformation of the organization to occur as an ecosystem.

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“This transformation takes technology, it takes process and people, all these things working together,” Gardner comments. “It’s not easy to do this. If you are not driving that people part of it and the business process part of it, you are not going to accomplish the digital transformation.”

This convergence, Gardner said, was what finally lead BNY Mellon to create what is called the digital ecosystem of NEXEN. It involves BNY Mellon employees, covering both technology and business areas, customers as well as partner collaborators, including WSO2.

APIs – the critical link within the ecosystem

WSO2’s API management solution was chosen for the NEXEN ecosystem’s API program. “We selected WSO2 not just for the reason that it was open source. It gave us the chance to be able to actually work with the code, and understand the behavior of the system.”

How important are APIs for this digital transformation?

To keep the BNY Mellon cloud as modern as possible, the team constantly refactors backend systems. For this, smaller teams need to be empowered to carry out a given functionality.

“So APIs become really critical in being able to implement the most modern microservices based platform and architecture that we can,” Gardner noted. His team needs to ensure that whatever generation of technology a service is architected upon, that there is a modern REST API that’s available not only to interact with software systems, but to also allow people to consume these services.

“The microservices and architecture end up being the enabler of the digital transformation,” Gardner said. “If you’re going to be able to have the business move quickly, and adapt to new technology – you have to have APIs as the enabling lifeblood of it.”

Developer productivity too, according to Gardner was fundamental in achieving digital transformation. With 13000 people in technology at BNY Mellon, he explained how important it was to enable them to move at the same velocity as the technology itself, with modern API capabilities.

“At the end of the day what we are doing via the NEXEN program and the API Program is we are building a digital ecosystem that allows collaborations, and allows us to operate as a digital enterprise where every aspect of our business is digital.”

For more detailed information on BNY Mellon’s NEXEN API program, view Gardner’s WSO2Con USA 2015 presentation.

To understand more about BNY Mellon, check out ‘A History of BNY Mellon’ on Youtube.

WSO2Con Asia 2016 – highlights, pictures and turkey tweets!

Last week we concluded WSO2Con Asia 2016 with a bang! Over 250 attendees from across the region joined us, making it our biggest user conference to date.

We had inspiring keynotes, customer stories and technical sessions ranging from analytics and API management to cloud and integration. We also had lots of fun like twitter competitions and after parties.

Here’s a recap on some of our most memorable moments…

Day 1 was dedicated to tutorials. The sessions provided hands-on experience and deep dives into key WSO2 products. The ones on microservices and IoT were specially popular.

Tutorials

The official start of the conference however, was day 2 where the punchy sounds of Sachintha and the Beat Drummers kicked things off at the opening ceremony.

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This was followed by the opening keynote by WSO2 Founder, CEO and Chief Architect Dr. Sanjiva Weerawarana. In his usual flair Sanjiva talked about WSO2’s progress in the past 10 years and how the WSO2 platform is being used by customers across industries such as  transport, government, entertainment, mobile and more. He also spoke about WSO2’s vision for the connected enterprise and its future in the middleware industry.

Sanjiva

Other keynotes for the day included an engaging presentation on Vega, the high performance electric sports car being developed in Sri Lanka. Dr. Harsha Subasinghe, the president and CEO of Codegen, and Dr. Beshan Kulapala, a research scientist at Codegen highlighted the challenges and opportunities in leading complex engineering projects to success.

Codegen

Dr. Frank Leymann, a director in the Institute of Architecture of Application Systems at University of Stuttgart, discussed loose coupling and its implications on microservice and cloud native architectures.

Frank Leymann

Isabelle Mauny, the vice president of product management at WSO2, gave the final keynote for the day on how analytics can improve customer experiences. Interestingly the phrase “Turkeys” was trending on our twitter dashboard during her talk!

The day continued with dedicated tracks running in parallel on cloud, API management, security and integration.

Several customers shared their experiences and how they have used the WSO2 Platform to effectively meet their technical and business goals.

Harshavardhan Mohanraj and Praveen Doddamani, technical leads at ZeOmega, spoke about how they leveraged the WSO2 platform to build a healthcare solution while improving component manageability and standardizing security in the API Management Track.

Zeomega

Ibrahim Khalil, a system integration analyst and team lead at Capgemini, spoke about how they leveraged their experience with United Nations agencies and built a vertical solution, enabled by WSO2 products, for UN organizations in the Cloud Track.

Ibrahim Khalili

Gina Keune, the team lead of integration and configuration at Royal Automobile Association, shared the challenges they faced and wins they celebrated when incrementally adopting SOA using WSO2.

Gina Keune

Charith De Silva, a lead architect at WSO2.Telco, introduced WSO2.Telco IDS which provides a fully Mobile Connect (OIDC) compliant solution for telcos embarking on a federated ID strategy.

Charith De Silva

This year we also hosted a special Strategy Forum for CxOs which saw attendees from companies such as Honeywell, NYU, John Keells Holdings, zMessenger, LOLC and more. The forum was led by WSO2 VP of Solutions Architecture Asanka Abeysinghe who spoke about the digital transformation of enterprise platforms.

Strategy Forum

The day ended with a networking event featuring smooth jazz tunes provided by Brown Sugar. Tasteful bites accompanied by cocktails coupled with lounge-like seating made it the perfect environment to catch up with industry experts and peers.

Networking event

The third and final day of the conference was also packed with insightful technical sessions. The tracks covered topics on governance, IT consumerization, analytics, devOps and app development.

The session on microservices attracted over a 100 of the attendees and proved to be one of the most popular talks of the day.

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Another popular talk was by Kiran Kumar, an enterprise architect at Wipro, who discussed a case study of a governance system where service governance meets API governance.

Kiran Kumar

The technical sessions came to an end with a closing keynote by Asanka and panel discussion on the benefits and effects of creating a digital enterprise.

Asanka Panel

In addition to the technical sessions, a team led by Srinath Perera, vice president of research at WSO2, showcased capabilities of the WSO2 Analytics platform by hooking up with Twitter to create a sentiment analyser. The project which tracked #wso2conasia was able to give valuable insights into sessions and popular topics. It also helped identify the most dedicated tweep, who walked away with a GoPro camera for his contributions.

Sentiment analysis

Sumedha Rubasinghe, director of API architecture at WSO2 also ran a project that combined  Google’s voice API with the soon to be released WSO2 IoT Server which displayed what speakers of each session were talking about.  This was just a sampling of what you can expect in the future with WSO2’s IoT Platform.

Voice Analyser

Source: Readme.LK

In true WSO2 style, WSO2Con Asia 2016 came to a close with a rocking after-party featuring the band Glory.

Party

In the coming weeks we’ll be sharing more details of the presentations, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime you can check out the slides for all sessions at the WSO2Con Asia website.

WSO2 Mashup Server–where to now?

mashup_logoYou may have noticed the WSO2 Mashup Server link has been retired from our menus, and seen that the WSO2 Mashup Server page on wso2.com directs you to the WSO2 Application Server product page.  Curious as to what’s going on?  Here’s the whole story, from inception to the present and looking towards the future.

Where the WSO2 Mashup Server led the way

I joined WSO2 back in 2006 as Director of Architecture for Mashup Technologies to explore ways to make the emerging stack of WS-* specifications approachable and efficient for the average Web developer.  The result was the WSO2 Mashup Server, which introduced a number of valuable ideas and features:

  • Expose simple Javascript functions as full-fledged SOAP Web services, bringing Web developer skills into the enterprise.
  • Simplify access to SOAP Web services from within Javascript (mashups or browser).
  • Make dealing with XML payloads easier.
  • Interface with other systems that Web developers are interested in, particularly feeds, data sources, and other web pages.
  • Build a try-it functionality allowing developers to point at a WSDL and get a usable form-based user interface to explore a Web service (or to provide a default user interface for any service.)
  • Make the results available in forms a Web developer cares about: web pages, gadget portals, feeds, instant messages, email messages.
  • Seed an ecosystem of reusable mashups by building community features into a multi-tenant environment, where each mashup exposes services that can be reused and recombined.
  • Host a public site (mooshup.com) for the mashup community.

The resulting product, the WSO2 Mashup Server, broke new ground and gained a lot of interest in the community, proving the value of
many of these ideas.  Here’s what the 1.x version looked like back then:image

These core features and ideas have over time influenced the WSO2 Carbon platform.  As more of these ideas have been incorporated broadly into the platform, the layer unique to the Mashup Server has become increasingly small.  Here are some ways the Mashup Server informed WSO2 Carbon platform evolution:

  • Multi-tenancy.  The early multi-tenancy (really more of multi-user than full isolation) in the Mashup Server allowed many users to register, author and share their own mashups with others, has evolved into a full multi-tenant architecture across the Carbon system, and has been a core feature cloud-enabling the WSO2 Stratos Platform-as-a-Service.
  • Social enterprise.  Enabling community features like tags, ratings, comments, granular feeds and search embedded those capacities into the underlying WSO2 Governance Registry.  They remain a key part of our governance capabilities and continue to evolve through initiatives such as the WSO2 API Manager’s API Store interface.
  • Try-it. Try-it for SOAP services has been integrated into all our products that focus on exposing services.  I personally think we have lost a bit of the “default user interface” focus over time and hope to push us back to regain and extend that aspect of developer experimentation, but an increasing preference for RESTful services which can be readily explored through simple tools like Curl is making that less urgent.
  • Gadgets.  The Google gadget dashboard and gadget generators made their first appearance as a component of the WSO2 Mashup Server, but were fairly quickly spun out into a separate product.
  • WSO2 Carbon.  It’s my view that WSO2 Mashup Server became in large part the straw that broke the back of the camel of a suite of related, but separately developed, products.  With many capabilities and shared components between WSO2 Mashup Server, WSO2 Data Services Server, WSO2 Governance Registry, WSO2 Gadget Server, coordinated development and releases across these products became untenable and helped motivate the hard but incredibly valuable work of moving towards the world’s first fully componentized middleware platform.
  • WSO2 StratosLive.  The multi-user publicly hosted WSO2 Mashup Server branded as mooshup.com site became redundant as the whole WSO2 Carbon platform emerged through WSO2 StratosLive as a solid public middleware PaaS encompassing the whole range of WSO2 products.  Mooshup.com was retired quite a while back when StratosLive came online.

What remains unique to the Mashup Server at this point is limited to the hosting of Javascript Web Services.

As our WSO2 Application Server product has expanded to encompass a platform for hosting a larger variety of web service and web application types, it makes sense to simply include Javascript services among that set.  So even though there is no longer a separate download for the WSO2 Mashup Server, the capabilities available in the final release remain present in the WSO2 Application Server.

Where the WSO2 Mashup Server missed the boat

It’s worthwhile to review some of the areas where the Mashup Server failed to reach the mainstream.  As a SOAP-centric and XML-centric model, it lost some relevancy as RESTful services and JSON have dominated the API ecosystem targeted at Web developers.  The Mashup Server’s focuses on APIs didn’t provide an easy environment for developing Web Applications – many Web Apps I built on as mashups were comprised of static HTML pages, AJAX and XML, without dynamic HTML creation and relying completely on AJAX to invoke any kind of server-side processing.  Not always the most straightfoward solution.

To address these needs, we’ve got a new approach.  Jaggery is a server-side Javascript framework, that allows the Web App or mobile developer to use the same models on the client and server sides: HTML, Javascript, and JSON.  Jaggery makes it easy both to generate dynamic web pages, but also to expose RESTful services.  It brings native JSON processing to the server side and thus makes it much easier to author Web/mobile clients and services and for them to work seamlessly together.

So if you’re using the WSO2 Mashup Server, you’ll find an easy transition to the WSO2 Application Server and I’m confident you’ll find this aggregation to be a straightforward and positive move.  And we encourage you to expand your ability to leverage the advantages of Javascript server-side development with Jaggery.

Jonathan Marsh
Vice President of Business Development
blog: http://jonathanmarsh.net/blog