Tag Archives: WSO2 Application Server

Guest Blog: Speeding Delivery of Affordable E-Health With WSO2

The good news is that modern technology is helping us to live longer. According to the Ambient Assisted Living Joint Programme, some 25% of the population in the European Union will be over 65 by the year 2020, and the number of people aged 65 to 80 years will rise by 40% between 2010 and 2030.

The challenge before us is to ensure that as people age, we can enable them to live independently and experience the highest quality of life possible—and do so in a way that is affordable for individuals and governments. Addressing that demand has been a key priority here in the Active Independent Living (AIL) group within Barcelona Digital Technology Center (BDigital).

We have built eKauri, a non-invasive e-health and smart home platform that empowers seniors to gain autonomy, participate in modern society, and achieve independence through eKauri1solutions based on information and communications technologies (ICT). It includes a patient application that provides a range of services activated by the users—for example a home media center and video conferencing—plus sensors that monitor the patient’s activities and environment. A second care center module gives caregivers and managers tools for such activities as monitoring and managing patients and handling patient alarms, among many others.

The cloud-enabled eKauri platform takes advantage of credit-card sized Raspberry Pi computers and Z-Wave wireless home automation devices within patients’ homes. It also relies on four eKauri2products from the open source WSO2 Carbon enterprise middleware platform: WSO2 API Manager, WSO2 Identity Server, WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus and WSO2 Application Server. Together, these products enable eKauri to tie together data, applications and services across a range of applications, computers and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

Notably, all WSO2 products extend from its Carbon base, so it created a seamless environment that allowed for our programmers to rapidly gain an understanding of the technology as well as accelerate our integration and product development.

Because our charter is to develop technology that commercial partners can then deliver as solutions to the market, we wanted to provide a minimally viable version that our commercial partners could start using by January 2015. By speeding our development with WSO2, we were able to complete the first minimally viable version of eKauri in October 2014, three months ahead of schedule, and we already have a built-in market and clients that want to pay for the product.

With a rapidly aging population worldwide, we need to move quickly to bring new solutions to market that enhance the health and quality of life for senior citizens. WSO2 has played an important role in helping us meet that demand with eKauri.

WSO2 recently published a case study about our use of its products with eKauri. You can read it here: http://wso2.com/casestudies/bdigital-delivers-e-health-and-smart-home-platform-using-the-wso2-carbon-platformJoan_Protasio

 

Joan Protasio, AIL Software Engineer, BDigital E-Health R&D Group

WSO2Con Insights–Trimble Builds an Enterprise PaaS Framework with Open Source

A large part of the value of Trimble solutions is that they enable customers to build and manage their own positioning-centric solutions for employees in the field—a key requirement for customers in the agriculture, construction, and transportation sectors. Trimble also needs this capability in-house, since its various divisions are set up to be entrepreneurial and have the speed and agility to execute. As Prakash Iyer, Trimble’s vice president for software architecture and strategy, explained during his session at WSO2Con 2013 US, building an enterprise platform as a service (PaaS) framework with open source solutions helped Trimble meet these goals.

The Move to a Cloud Platform

When Trimble first considered building a flexible development platform, the question was whether to go with a traditional platform versus a product-driven platform, Iyer recalled. With a traditional platform, by the time the hard work is done, the technology is likely to have changed, he noted. The better solution, the Trimble team realized, was a product-driven platform where selection of the platform elements is driven by the product. Users can then build applications on the platform and deliver them efficiently.

PrakashIyer1The Trimble Platform as a Service, known as TPaaS, provides the core services needed to build any modern enterprise application, and also provides an architectural framework to build loosely coupled SOA applications, Iyer explained. Providing a foundation for TPaaS are four multi-tenant, cloud-enabled WSO2 Carbon products: WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus, WSO2 API Manager, WSO2 Application Server, and WSO2 Identity Server.

“Our first implementation of TPaaS had Identity Server, App Server, API Manager and ESB. We didn’t use the whole stack but then we incrementally added to it,” Iyer noted. “We’re able to then build an app on that platform and then deliver it to the team, and prove it can be done efficiently. And that creates momentum.”

TPaaS Supports Internal and External Users

Iyer explained that Trimble’s development platform includes deployment infrastructure and managed hosting services, all of which help reduce the cost, time, and complexity of application development.

A key advantage of TPaaS is that it is accessible to Trimble’s network of partners and dealers, who often need to use the system to exchange data and flow transactions through it, Iyer said. It can be offered as a service framework to these partners and dealers to host their applications. He noted that the platform also provides a cloud container that can host any Trimble service, and act as a gateway to share any Trimble service for wider reuse.

The Benefits of Open Source

While the cost savings of open source were attractive, Iyer stated that other aspects of an open source licensing model were important.

“We can take WSO2 and customize it. If we don’t find everything we need, we can PrakashIyer3 customize it. We don’t have to take everything, just the part needed for us,” Iyer observed. “The other advantage is portability and ownership. I want to take my PaaS across multiple infrastructures and services; some divisions may want to deploy in Rackspace, some in Amazon, or even internally.”

Additionally, since technology changes so quickly, using WSO2 open source products allows  Trimble to avoid costly investments in solutions that will become out of date, or can’t be customized. Finally, there was the issue of focus. Iyer recalled that Trimble needed to build a solution, and using open source would allow the team to focus on those areas where Trimble could differentiate.

“My goal was always to eventually have everything from writing the code to deployment; things we could assemble and put together our own platform, and then we can focus on the applications,” Iyer said. “That was the strategic alignment part we shared with WSO2.”

For more information about Trimble’s development of an enterprise PaaS framework, view Iyer’s WSO2Con 2013 presentation.

WSO2Con-US-2013--Building-an-Enterprise-PaaS-framework-using-Open-Source-Components

A Pragmatic Approach to the API Façade Pattern

[Based on a post originally appearing at http://asanka.abeysinghe.org/2013/04/pragmatic-approach-to-api-facade-pattern.html.]

Business APIs expose business functionality for access by external and internal consumers.  In technical terms APIs provide an abstract layer for the internal business services to cater to consumer demand.

Most service platforms are not ready-made to safely and cleanly expose internal services to consumers, posing a common challenge for API providers.  Providing a pragmatic approach to the well-known API Façade pattern is the motivation of writing this post.

Fanike-harajuku-store-opening-1cades hide the complexity of internal implementations and provide simple interfaces.  This is a common pattern in computer science but we can even find it in real world too. Lets look at a real world example first: if you walk to a shoe store you find samples displayed in a manner making them easy to pick and select, but if you walk to the back oUntitled 2f the store you will find a massive warehouse with millions of shoes that will not provide an easy way find the correct shoe for you. What does the showroom do?  It provides a facade that displays the shoes in a way that helps buyers select and buy the shoes they want, thereby reducing the complexity and enhancing the buying experience.

Similarly, facades used in computer systems hide complexity and provide a better experience for the consumers (demand).

FacadeDesignPattern

Lets look at how Façade pattern applies for API Management. There is a clear gap between the consumer demand for APIs and the internal services available in each enterprise. As an example, consumers look for Web APIs that can access using REST principles, deliver content using JSON and secured by OAuth addition to that the APIs can be externally accessible and discover. This may map to an authenticated XML/SOAP based service within the enterprise.

API Façade patterns mainly contains four functional layers:

1. Backend services
2. Mediation
3. Façade
4. External format / Demand Slide08

Most commercial API Management solutions treat the Mediation, Façade and Demand as a single functional, architecture as well as deployment layer.

Slide09

If we look at the gap between backend services and the Demand, can a lightweight mediation layer with limited service bindings such as HTTP/s, JMS can build a business API? Are you willing to add the resulting additional wrapper service layer and maintain it?

WSO2 recommends more pragmatic approach by recommending dividing the Façade layer and Mediation layer into clear functional, architecture and deployment layers.

Slide13

This architecture can facilitate heavy mediation including service chaining/orchestration to provide a business friendly API for the consumers. This also allows one to do a clean deployment by inheriting the infrastructure policies appropriate for each layer, as well as scale each architecture layer separately.

Slide15

Implementation of WSO2 API Façade is facilitated by using the WSO2 API Manager to build the Demand and Façade layers, the WSO2 ESB to build the Mediation layer (also add in products like the WSO2 Business Process Server if required) and connect to the existing services. If you are planning to write new set of backend services using standards such as JAX-WS, JAX-RS you can use the WSO2 Application Server as a runtime. In addition to that if there are any other business/technical requirements to build new business APIs you can add them with or after the mediation layer by leveraging the 17+ products in the WSO2 Middleware Platform.

This pragmatic and architecturally rich approach of WSO2 API Façade pattern results many benefits for the API management solutions:

  • Clean architecture by separating the concerns
  • Have a clear separation of internal and external processing of an API call
  • Ability to scale based on the actual usage of each layer
  • Avoid implementing new services or building wrapper service layers
  • Leverage SOA principles with the new Web API architecture
  • Utilize the middleware and go to market quickly

Having said that if you are planning to have a single layer to facilitate all three layers of API Façade, there are no technical limitations in WSO2 API Management Platform to doing that. You can build the mediation by configuring the pre-configured ESB running as the internal dispatching engine of API Gateway.  However for a real-world deployment we recommend that you consider using the flexible, componentized nature of the WSO2 platform to build a clean, scalable, manageable WSO2 API Façade. In my next post I’ll talk more about how to implement this pattern using WSO2 technologies.

Asanka Abeysinghe
Vice President of Solutions Architecture
Blog: http://asanka.abeysinghe.org

WSO2 Mashup Server–where to now?

mashup_logoYou may have noticed the WSO2 Mashup Server link has been retired from our menus, and seen that the WSO2 Mashup Server page on wso2.com directs you to the WSO2 Application Server product page.  Curious as to what’s going on?  Here’s the whole story, from inception to the present and looking towards the future.

Where the WSO2 Mashup Server led the way

I joined WSO2 back in 2006 as Director of Architecture for Mashup Technologies to explore ways to make the emerging stack of WS-* specifications approachable and efficient for the average Web developer.  The result was the WSO2 Mashup Server, which introduced a number of valuable ideas and features:

  • Expose simple Javascript functions as full-fledged SOAP Web services, bringing Web developer skills into the enterprise.
  • Simplify access to SOAP Web services from within Javascript (mashups or browser).
  • Make dealing with XML payloads easier.
  • Interface with other systems that Web developers are interested in, particularly feeds, data sources, and other web pages.
  • Build a try-it functionality allowing developers to point at a WSDL and get a usable form-based user interface to explore a Web service (or to provide a default user interface for any service.)
  • Make the results available in forms a Web developer cares about: web pages, gadget portals, feeds, instant messages, email messages.
  • Seed an ecosystem of reusable mashups by building community features into a multi-tenant environment, where each mashup exposes services that can be reused and recombined.
  • Host a public site (mooshup.com) for the mashup community.

The resulting product, the WSO2 Mashup Server, broke new ground and gained a lot of interest in the community, proving the value of
many of these ideas.  Here’s what the 1.x version looked like back then:image

These core features and ideas have over time influenced the WSO2 Carbon platform.  As more of these ideas have been incorporated broadly into the platform, the layer unique to the Mashup Server has become increasingly small.  Here are some ways the Mashup Server informed WSO2 Carbon platform evolution:

  • Multi-tenancy.  The early multi-tenancy (really more of multi-user than full isolation) in the Mashup Server allowed many users to register, author and share their own mashups with others, has evolved into a full multi-tenant architecture across the Carbon system, and has been a core feature cloud-enabling the WSO2 Stratos Platform-as-a-Service.
  • Social enterprise.  Enabling community features like tags, ratings, comments, granular feeds and search embedded those capacities into the underlying WSO2 Governance Registry.  They remain a key part of our governance capabilities and continue to evolve through initiatives such as the WSO2 API Manager’s API Store interface.
  • Try-it. Try-it for SOAP services has been integrated into all our products that focus on exposing services.  I personally think we have lost a bit of the “default user interface” focus over time and hope to push us back to regain and extend that aspect of developer experimentation, but an increasing preference for RESTful services which can be readily explored through simple tools like Curl is making that less urgent.
  • Gadgets.  The Google gadget dashboard and gadget generators made their first appearance as a component of the WSO2 Mashup Server, but were fairly quickly spun out into a separate product.
  • WSO2 Carbon.  It’s my view that WSO2 Mashup Server became in large part the straw that broke the back of the camel of a suite of related, but separately developed, products.  With many capabilities and shared components between WSO2 Mashup Server, WSO2 Data Services Server, WSO2 Governance Registry, WSO2 Gadget Server, coordinated development and releases across these products became untenable and helped motivate the hard but incredibly valuable work of moving towards the world’s first fully componentized middleware platform.
  • WSO2 StratosLive.  The multi-user publicly hosted WSO2 Mashup Server branded as mooshup.com site became redundant as the whole WSO2 Carbon platform emerged through WSO2 StratosLive as a solid public middleware PaaS encompassing the whole range of WSO2 products.  Mooshup.com was retired quite a while back when StratosLive came online.

What remains unique to the Mashup Server at this point is limited to the hosting of Javascript Web Services.

As our WSO2 Application Server product has expanded to encompass a platform for hosting a larger variety of web service and web application types, it makes sense to simply include Javascript services among that set.  So even though there is no longer a separate download for the WSO2 Mashup Server, the capabilities available in the final release remain present in the WSO2 Application Server.

Where the WSO2 Mashup Server missed the boat

It’s worthwhile to review some of the areas where the Mashup Server failed to reach the mainstream.  As a SOAP-centric and XML-centric model, it lost some relevancy as RESTful services and JSON have dominated the API ecosystem targeted at Web developers.  The Mashup Server’s focuses on APIs didn’t provide an easy environment for developing Web Applications – many Web Apps I built on as mashups were comprised of static HTML pages, AJAX and XML, without dynamic HTML creation and relying completely on AJAX to invoke any kind of server-side processing.  Not always the most straightfoward solution.

To address these needs, we’ve got a new approach.  Jaggery is a server-side Javascript framework, that allows the Web App or mobile developer to use the same models on the client and server sides: HTML, Javascript, and JSON.  Jaggery makes it easy both to generate dynamic web pages, but also to expose RESTful services.  It brings native JSON processing to the server side and thus makes it much easier to author Web/mobile clients and services and for them to work seamlessly together.

So if you’re using the WSO2 Mashup Server, you’ll find an easy transition to the WSO2 Application Server and I’m confident you’ll find this aggregation to be a straightforward and positive move.  And we encourage you to expand your ability to leverage the advantages of Javascript server-side development with Jaggery.

Jonathan Marsh
Vice President of Business Development
blog: http://jonathanmarsh.net/blog

WSO2 product’s; summer release round-up

Couple of weeks ago, CTO Paul Fremantle and Tech Evangelist Chris Haddad, conducted a webinar on the innovative advancements of the WSO2 Carbon middleware and WSO2 Stratos cloud platforms. Here are some highlights from their presentation

  • WSO2 Carbon core 4.0 released with many improvement and new features
    • Enhanced Deployment Synchronizer
    • Deployment performance improvements
    • Managements and worker node separation
    • JDK 1.7 support
    • Better integration with Tomcat 7
    • Upgrading Equinox SDK (OSGI Runtime) to v3.7
    • P2 Repository: Features grouped by product
    • Multi Tenancy in Carbon
“The Carbon platform is your reconfigurable modular middleware. Recently we’ve seen lots more customers actually wanting to de-couple different parts of a product to vertically scale while at the same time horizontally scaling. This capability is proving to be a major benefit of the Carbon platform.”
– Paul Fremantle  
“We are rapidly evolving all of our products simultaneously on top of single cohesive code base. This is unparalleled in the industry to have such coordinated releases on a single platform.”
– Chris Haddad
  • WSO2 Stratos 2.0 Platform as a Service will include
    • Support for multiple languages and runtimes
    • Support for more IaaS providers (vmWare, EC2, OpenStack, CloudStack, Rackspace etc.) via Jcloud
    • Enhanced manageability
“We are embracing a heterogeneous environment were you can run PHP in the cloud environment and take advantage of the rich set of PaaS foundation services that Stratos offers. Also you can plug-in any application server or asynchronous  server and cloud-ify  the application environment by having an mechanism that ties back into the pass foundation and Startos controller services.”
– Chris Haddad
“The key differentiator for Startos is its inherent multi-tenancy. There are other PaaS offering that have the polyglot language support but what they don’t have is the concept and modeling of multi-tenancy. That plus the richness of the set of Stratos services that the cartridges have available to you make us really stand out.”
– Paul Fremantle

You can watch the full recording of the webinar here: http://wso2.org/library/webinars/2012/09/wso2-carbon-wso2-stratos-summer-release-roundup

 – Hasmin AbdulCader, Director, Communications

Hot summer releases to watch out for!

From an all new API Manager and a software development lifecycle management product (WSO2 AppFactory), to supporting new cloud technologies, totally new versions of WSO2 BAM and WSO2 Message Broker, you won’t want to miss what’s coming up this summer at WSO2.

As the team constantly looks at ways to stay ahead of the game, they’ve also made significant enhancements to the WSO2 Carbon framework and products such as the ESB, Governance Registry, Application Server, and Stratos.

We managed to get a hold of CTO, Paul Fremantle, to give you an overview of what’s in store on this technical update video:

Hasmin AbdulCader, Director, Communications
http://www.twitter.com/hasmina

Smart Endpoint Registry finds the best service for a particular client

Architects at WSO2 recently built a Smart Endpoint Registry solution for a large electronic media distributor. The driving force was the efficient routing of requests to the service best suited for that particular request.  To provide the lowest latency the request should be routed to the closest geographical data center.  Based on the processing requirements a particular message might be routed to a specialized service.  Or requests from premium customers can be routed to higher-capability servers.  In addition, services also move regularly between data centers for operational reasons.  The solution developed routes requests based on logic matching the message to a list of registered services using metadata such as the type of service requested, the geographical location of the service, the business group the service belongs to, the API version, and so forth.

In this solution, the service definitions and endpoint addresses are stored as resources in a centralized WSO2 Governance Registry. Properties can be associated with each service resource to indicate the geography etc.  Routing logic examines these property values to determine the address of the optimum endpoint.

The WSO2 ESB does the actual message routing, picking up message headers (such as the source IP) and comparing it with information in the registry to locate the most appropriate service and determine it’s endpoint address. With endpoint lookup complete, the message can be successfully routed to the optimum service for processing.

As services come online, each service registers itself with the WSO2 Governance Registry by writing it’s details directly to the registry during it’s initialization (in WSO2 Application Server, the “init” method).  When they go offline (the “destruct” method) they remove their entries from the Registry. There are two available APIs that can be used to create the appropriate entries and to register the service metadata as properties – a Web services API or the RESTful ATOM-based API. Setting properties is an easy and flexible way to associate structured metadata with a resource as name-value pairs.

A housekeeping task periodically checks that registered services remain online and removes service entries for those that may have gone down without proper destruction.

Composite services (in this case BPEL-based services executed in the WSO2 Business Process Server) can also route their dependent services through the ESB to find the most appropriate match – or they can look up service endpoints directly from the Governance Registry in cases where the full matching logic isn’t necessary.

ws-discovery-extended
The Smart Endpoint Registry scenario has similarities with other discovery mechanisms such as WS-Discovery. In both the Smart Endpoint Registry pattern and in WS-Discovery, services coming online are automatically made available to the system. But beyond the surface similarities lie significant differences. This scenario goes beyond WS-Discovery with more sophisticated property matching and searching logic to match services and clients. WS-Discovery also is appropriate for a subnet that supports multi-cast IP, providing standard “hello” and “goodbye” messages to register. But in this case the data centers are widely dispersed and a multi-cast-based discovery mechanism can’t span the network range, and so a customized init/destruct process had to be used.

The WSO2 Carbon platform is an excellent platform for implementing this pattern. The ease and flexibility of adding look-up logic in the ESB using logic control and look-up mediators, the convenient APIs for writing to the Governance Registry and structured properties on each resource, and support for init/destruct in the WSO2 Application Server all combine to offer a straightforward implementation of the solution.

Asanka Abeysinghe, Director of Solutions Architecture
Asanka’s blog: http://asanka.abeysinghe.org/

Defining a Generic API

With a premium placed on loose coupling, a typical SOA deployment displays a high degree of heterogeneity. Different service platforms run in scattered datacenters on a variety of server hardware, operating systems, and development platforms. The services expose different communication and security standards. Individual SOA implementation and maintenance teams will become acclimated to the level of heterogeneity with exposure to the environment, but when an external or internal consumer tries to access the SOA, they will come face to face with this complexity.

image

A common way to simplify and normalize interactions with a heterogeneous environment is to provide a unified API for service consumers — a unified, generic service layer.

One of our commercial bank customers with multiple service platforms began a project of defining a unified services layer, generalizing the the multiple service platforms active in the bank. At first they approached the problem in the traditional way: writing wrapper/proxy services in front of each of the existing services.  As part of an engagement with WSO2 they changed to a “Generic API” solution pattern which dramatically simplified the project by hiding the internal complexity of each service behind a user friendly API, a common URL for service access, and unified security policies.

The “Generic API” pattern installs a common API for the existing service infrastructure, converts traditional applications to services exposed over a normalized set of communication and security protocols, and provides a foundation supporting the easy addition of future service platforms.

image

When implemented with WSO2 products, the Generic API pattern leverages the WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and WSO2 Governance Registry. The WSO2 ESB connects with the back-end service layers and legacy applications, and exposes them through a new service layer.  This is easily accomplished with the proxy service capability of the WSO2 ESB.  Supporting a wide variety of of the transports and message formats, the WSO2 ESB provides a central hub for protocol switching and security mediation between the heterogeneous systems.

With sophisticated transformation capabilities, the WSO2 ESB extends the Generic API pattern to the problem of unifying data models, by converting or mapping messages representing different data models into a common and easily consumed model.

Storing and publishing common metadata such as service descriptions and policies describing the generic API also aids new developers interacting with the system.  In the deployment above, the WSO2 Governance Registry provides a common repository for storing and sharing all the necessary SOA artifacts.

The Generic API pattern provides the foundation for other other solution patterns as well.  In future posts we’ll discuss solution architectures for a Public Services Gateway and an Internal Services Gateway pattern.

Asanka Abeysinghe, Director of Solutions Architecture
Asanka’s blog: http://asanka.abeysinghe.org/

Adding the dynamism of events to a Master Data Management solution

The WSO2 platform provides all the capabilities to address two common architecture patterns — Master Data Management (MDM) and Event Driven Architecture (EDA).

The integration of these two powerful ideas allowed a System Integrator (and WSO2 customer) to refactor and modernize their architecture in their latest release, and roll that out smoothly to their customers.  The new architecture centered around the MDM and EDA patterns.  Built-in facilities enabling MDM and EDA patterns played a factor in choosing the WSO2 SOA-based Middleware Platform.

The existing application software includes a number of RDBMS data repositories, exposed through application-level APIs from various systems. Requirements for the new architecture included the reuse of the existing data as well as support for updates to the existing data stores from messages originating in the new architecture. Even though existing data was reused, the existing data model was not proving a good fit with the new architecture. Therefore converting the data to a new data model also became a key requirement. The MDM pattern fulfilled these two requirements by connecting to the data repositories and converting the data into a universal data model.

The WSO2 platform sports a number of features useful for implementing MDM.  The OxygenTank article Implementing MDM Patterns on WSO2 SOA Platform describes a pattern called Service Adapters that applied neatly to this situation, leveraging the legacy APIs for data access.  The adapters were coded in Java and deployed in the WSO2 Application Server.  WS-Transfer facilitated transformation of the data models and exposed the new universal data model through XML Web Services.

image

The message exchange pattern (MEP) used to integrate the application components was pub-sub (publish and subscribe), bringing EDA into the picture. Pub-Sub extends the loose coupling of a SOA, allowing new data sources to be integrated by a simple publish/subscribe operation.  The WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus’s native support for the WS-Eventing standard allows it to act as an event broker, while extending mediation capabilities to any pub-sub interaction as well as providing all the QoS controls available within the ESB.

By introducing a controller into the architecture, more sophisticated event flows are possible, controlled by business processes and rules. In this architecture, the controller was implemented by using WSO2 Application Server and WSO2 Business Process Server, and combined standard JAX-WS based services and rules defined in BPEL.

Dynamic discovery emerged as a key requirement to avoid tightly coupling of service endpoints.  The combination of WS-Discovery support and a compatible service deployer, endpoint availability is published as each service is deployed.

Integration of a Registry/Repository was identified as a key requirement to store service and configuration metadata as well as to enable dynamic metadata look-up. These facilities are provided by the WSO2 Governance Registry, which in addition to a metadata store hosts the topic store for topic-based event subscriptions.

image

The logical architecture solution above maps to a variety of deployment patterns for different clients of the system integrator, meeting their individual demands for scalability, high availability, infrastructure constraints, and so forth.

The application of aspects of Event Driven Architecture to the problem of Master Data Management adds flexibility and increases the advantages of loose coupling so prized in modern SOA solutions.  We hope the pattern described above gives you some ideas of how your current integration challenges can be approached.

Asanka Abeysinghe, Director of Solutions Architecture
Asanka’s blog: http://asanka.abeysinghe.org/