Tag Archives: WSO2

Nutanix: How WSO2’s Identity Server Enhanced Customer Experience

Nutanix is a leader in hyper converged systems with a mission to make infrastructure invisible by delivering an enterprise cloud platform that enables you to focus on the applications and services that power your business. At WSO2Con USA 2017, Director of SaaS and Tools Engineering at Nutanix Manoj Thirutheri explored how WSO2 Identity Server helped them enhance their customer experience to stay competitive against large vendors like HP, Microsoft and Cisco.

Nutanix provides over 4450 customers across the globe with a hyperconvergence appliance that has storage, virtualization and network components overlaid by an intelligent software layer in order to minimize the need for infrastructure. “Customer experience is the last mile of digital transformation,” Manoj said while stressing on the importance of creating an integrated ecosystem of customers and partners to be successful. They currently maintain multiple web portals for customer support, partner support, and the community. One of their top priorities is to make customer experiences as simple and seamless as possible. They needed to create a more seamless sign-on experience for their portals and mobile apps to maintain growth.

Because of the speed at which Nutanix was growing, many identity silos existed, which meant the same customer was identified in multiple ways. They had non-standard and insecure authentication and authorization mechanisms in place which made them vulnerable and hindered their user experience. Furthermore, their ability to be agile and innovate fast was deterred by the proprietary technology they used, which was not open or extendable. “The bottom line is, we didn’t know what our customers or partners were doing. We were lost,” notes Manoj. Having a 360 view of their customers’ activities and keeping track of them across the different portals were key requirements of their solution to these challenges.

As shown in the diagram below, Nutanix used WSO2 Identity Server to overcome their major identity and access management challenges. Manoj then explained the architecture from the bottom up. The highly available WSO2 Identity Server cluster is load balanced across multiple regions for high redundancy. Next, they built an intelligent API layer, which exposed all the APIs including user management, tenant management, service provider and identity provider APIs. By doing so they avoided vendor lock-in and didn’t couple their functionality to any technology, be it open source or proprietary. The third layer consisted of their own entitlement system called My Nutanix where customers and partners register and access the service providers. The green boxes at the top depict the service providers including the following:

  • The customer portal enables customers to access the services offered in My Nutanix.
  • The partner portal allows partners to perform deal registrations among other things.
  • The community portal is open source and can be used by anyone. Here, they use WSO2 Identity Server to authenticate the users through basic OAuth over Transport Layer Security (TLS), which allows them to track the users and gain new customer prospects.
  • They also have the educational and training portal in addition to many other service providers that are still in development.

Nutanix currently uses many industry standards for authentication including OAuth 2.0, OpenID Connect, and SAML 2.0, which are all supported out-of-the-box by WSO2 Identity Server. They also use WSO2 Identity Server for Just-in-Time (JIT) provisioning of users. Nutanix performs SMS-based multi-factor authentication (MFA) by using WSO2 Identity Server connectors to integrate with Twilio, which allows you to programmatically send and receive text messages using its web service APIs. In addition, they integrate with their partners through the Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) provided by WSO2 Identity Server.

Apart from these implemented features, Nutanix is working on leveraging more capabilities of WSO2 Identity Server. They will soon bring in multi-tenancy because every customer has their own tenant with their own isolated roles. They will also experiment with a service-based authentication, a fairly new concept to them, which uses certificates to authenticate the user and creates the service accounts within WSO2 Identity Server. As Manoj states, “Two services, no human interaction”.

Having a product that is open source, supported multiple security protocols, and can scale was key. WSO2 Identity Server met all these requirements. WSO2 Identity Server helped create a seamless single sign-on experience for their customers, partners and prospects, while keeping track of all their actions. A key advantage that helped sustain Nutanix’s rapid growth was WSO2 Identity Server’s high scalability and availability and its ability to support a rapid increase in the number of users from 1000 to 100,000 in just two years. It met all of Nutanix’s requirements including out-of-the-box support for many standard protocols, multi-factor authentication (both SMS-based and Google authenticator), identity federation, multi-tenancy and tenant management. Furthermore, Nutanix also used WSO2 Managed Cloud, which provides excellent support.

“We now have a bunch of happy customers and partners. We ourselves are also very happy with WSO2 Identity Server,” Manoj added.To learn more about how Nutanix leveraged WSO2 watch Manoj’s talk at WSO2Con USA 2017.

How we ended up hatching startups

One of the first things anyone working at WSO2 learns is the email system. As an open source company, we stick to the Apache way of doing things, which means that all important communication is done across email – and these emails are open for anyone in the company to read and reply to, regardless of where they work and what they’re working on.

You’d think that this means a LOT of email on a daily basis, and you’d be right. On the other hand, it means questions, like “Is there anything we can do for startups” get picked up faster than a hot Stackoverflow thread.

In fact, the exact scenario happened a couple of months ago. Over the course of a week-long brainstorm across email, we realized that a lot of startups (at least, here in Sri Lanka) were sorely in need of technical expertise. Often, business-minded founders would invest capital, hire a third-party to build their application for them – and lacking the technical expertise to make architectural calls, they’d struggle with frameworks, iterations, system requirements and everything else thereafter.

We also realized that we could help fix that. For free.

And thus the Hatchery was born.

hatchy-colombo-logo

WSO2 Hatchery (note the cute dragon) is our free CTO-as-a-service. The idea is simple: if you’re a startup, you pitch your problem to a panel of our best solutions architects. These folks have worked with everything from Fortune 500 companies to startups; you pair off with them – and get to consult them as your CTO, free, for a period of three months. They provide high-level technical understanding – the kind that non-technical founders often need.  

The caveat is simple: the problem has to be something we can solve with any of our open source products.

It’s a simple way of making sure it plays within our direct field of expertise. Given the vast range of problems that WSO2 products can solve – everything from securely logging into a website to connecting two enterprise systems together – it gives us a lot of flexibility to play with.

After much back and forth across email, we went ahead with our first Hatchery event in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Our Media Partner for the event, Readme.lk, did an excellent recap of the event. To summarize, we enrolled sixteen startups in the program – and over the next three months, our team will be working with them to ensure that their dreams become reality.

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What’s next? The Hatchery is not meant to be a solely Sri Lankan project. This first event is a learning experience for us, too. Once we have the data in place – participation, ideas for improvement, the kind of metrics we need to track – we hope to be able to scale this, and take it global. With our offices in the US and the UK, we have the right tools to bring everyone to the Hatchery. It’s just a matter of figuring out the tiny details.

Curious to see what it looked like? You can check out the event’s photo album on Facebook here.

Solving the DEBS 2016 Grand Challenge using WSO2 CEP

The ACM DEBS Grand Challenge is a yearly competition where the participants implement an event-based solution to solve a real world high-volume streaming data problem.

This year’s grand challenge involves developing a solution to solve two (real world) problems by analyzing a social-network graph that evolves over times. The data for the DEBS 2016 Grand Challenge has been generated using Linked Data Benchmark Council (LDBC) social network data generator. The ranking of the solutions is carried out by measuring their performance using two performance metrics: (1) throughput and (2) average latency.

WSO2’s been submitting solutions to the grand challenge since 2013, and our previous grand challenge solutions have been ranked as one of the top solutions among the submissions. This year, too, we submitted a solution using WSO2 CEP/Siddhi. Based on its performance, this year’s solution has also been selected as one of the best solutions. As a result, we’ve been invited to submit a full paper to the DEBS 2016 conference to be held from 20 June to June 24.

In this blog I’ll present some details of DEBS queries, (a brief) overview our solution and some performance results.

Query 1

As pointed out earlier, DEBS 2016 involves developing an event-based solution to solve two real world use cases of an event processing application.

The first problem (query) deals with the identification of posts that currently trigger the most activity in a social network. This query accepts two input streams namely the posts and comments.

Think of a Facebook post with comments. Our goal is to compute the top three active posts where the score of a post is computed as the sum of its own score and the score of its related comments. The initial score of a post is 10 and it decreases by 1 every 24 hours. Similarly, the initial score of a comment is also 10 and decreases by 1 in the same manner.

Note that the score of a post/comment cannot reach below zero; a post whose total score is greater than zero is defined as an active post.

Query 2

The second deals with the identification of large communities that are currently involved in a topic.

This query accepts three input streams : 1) comments 2) likes and 3) friendships.

The aim is to find the k comments with the largest range, where the comments were created more than d seconds ago. Range here is defined as the size of the largest connected components in the graph defined by the persons who have liked that comment and know each other.

The friendship stream plays an important role in this query, as it establishes the friendships between the users in the system. The following figures shows the friendship graph when the system receives 10 and 100 friendship events respectively.

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Figure 1: Friendship Graph (Number of Events = 10)

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Figure 2: Friendship Graph (Number of Events = 100)

Further analysis of the friendship graph indicates that the degree of distribution of the friendship graph is long-tailed (see Figure 3). This means that there are very small number of users who have a large number of friends and a large number of users have a few friends.

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Figure 3: Degree Distribution of Friendship Graph

Solution Overview

We implemented the solution using WSO2 CEP as an extension to Siddhi. The solution is a multi-threaded: it processes the two queries in parallel.

Each query is processed as a pipeline where the pipeline consists of three phases: 1) data loading, 2) event-ordering and 3) processing. Each phase in the query is processed using one or more threads. In the data loading phase the data streams are loaded from the files (i.e.disk) and placed in (separate) buffers. Each event stream has its own buffer which is implemented as a blocking queue.

The purpose of the event-ordering phase is to order the events based on their timestamps prior to sending them to the event processor (note: As far as events in an event buffer is concerned, they are already ordered based on their timestamps. The purpose of the ordering done in this phase is to ensure that the merged event-stream that is sent to event processor is ordered based on their timestamps). The core calculation modules of the queries are implemented in the processing thread.

Performance results

The solution was tested on a four core/8GB virtual machine running Ubuntu Server 15.10. As discussed earlier, the two performance metrics used for evaluating the system are the throughput and the mean latency. The performance evaluation has been carried out using two data sets of different sizes (see here and here).

The throughput and mean latency of query 1 for the small data set are 96,004 events/second and 6.11 ms respectively. For the large data set the throughput and mean latency of the query 1 are 71,127 events/sec and 13 ms.

The throughput and mean latency of query 2 for the small data set are 215,642 events/second and 0.38 ms respectively. For the large data set the throughput and mean latency of the query 2 are 327,549 events/sec and 0.73 ms.

A detailed description of the queries and specific optimization techniques that we have used in our queries can be found in a paper titled Continuous Analytics on Graph Data Streams using WSO2 Complex Event Processor, which will be presented shortly  in DEBS 2016: the 10th ACM International Conference Event-Based Systems, June 2016.

WSO2Con Insights: How WSO2’s Open Source API Management Platform is Enabling BNY Mellon’s Digital Transformation

Let’s talk numbers. Bank of New York Mellon (BNY Mellon) runs a set of systems that track up to USD 30 trillion worth of wealth globally through investment management, investment services and wealth management. That’s about a quarter of all the world’s wealth of private assets, assets under management and assets under custody and/or administration.

When it comes to technology numbers, BNY Mellon operates a private cloud out of their own data centers, and has about 900 projects going on at any moment in time, run and managed smoothly by a 13,000 strong team.

During his talk at WSO2Con USA 2015, Michael Gardner, managing director and Head of the BNY Mellon Innovation Center explained how these numbers converged into creating the NEXEN digital ecosystem powered by WSO2’s API management platform, to transform the financial services industry.

The path of the open source code

Software driven disruption is impacting every company in every industry, Gardner noted, and the only way to survive is to keep moving in the same velocity, ability and agility as technology itself. Companies have evolved from mere ecommerce-related online retailers to managing entire customer relationships, to complete supply chain management and today, to digitized business operations. Such a company, according research firm Gartner, is defined as a ‘digital enterprise’.

Gardner noted that it’s critical for BNY Mellon to be a digital enterprise, to have the ability to accept new technologies and adapt, pushing very hard on it’s digital transformation and doing so by converging various technologies. He then went on to express why open source is now the center of their focus in this transformation.

“Open Source is very very important to us,” Gardner said. “We believe that open source is the future of enterprise collaboration. It’s not because it’s free. That’s great… but it (open source) becomes the basis for enterprises to collaborate together to evolve software mutually in ways that they need.”

The NEXEN digital ecosystem

BNY Mellon is bringing a collection of progressive software projects and technologies together, with an API program that enables the digital transformation of the organization to occur as an ecosystem.

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“This transformation takes technology, it takes process and people, all these things working together,” Gardner comments. “It’s not easy to do this. If you are not driving that people part of it and the business process part of it, you are not going to accomplish the digital transformation.”

This convergence, Gardner said, was what finally lead BNY Mellon to create what is called the digital ecosystem of NEXEN. It involves BNY Mellon employees, covering both technology and business areas, customers as well as partner collaborators, including WSO2.

APIs – the critical link within the ecosystem

WSO2’s API management solution was chosen for the NEXEN ecosystem’s API program. “We selected WSO2 not just for the reason that it was open source. It gave us the chance to be able to actually work with the code, and understand the behavior of the system.”

How important are APIs for this digital transformation?

To keep the BNY Mellon cloud as modern as possible, the team constantly refactors backend systems. For this, smaller teams need to be empowered to carry out a given functionality.

“So APIs become really critical in being able to implement the most modern microservices based platform and architecture that we can,” Gardner noted. His team needs to ensure that whatever generation of technology a service is architected upon, that there is a modern REST API that’s available not only to interact with software systems, but to also allow people to consume these services.

“The microservices and architecture end up being the enabler of the digital transformation,” Gardner said. “If you’re going to be able to have the business move quickly, and adapt to new technology – you have to have APIs as the enabling lifeblood of it.”

Developer productivity too, according to Gardner was fundamental in achieving digital transformation. With 13000 people in technology at BNY Mellon, he explained how important it was to enable them to move at the same velocity as the technology itself, with modern API capabilities.

“At the end of the day what we are doing via the NEXEN program and the API Program is we are building a digital ecosystem that allows collaborations, and allows us to operate as a digital enterprise where every aspect of our business is digital.”

For more detailed information on BNY Mellon’s NEXEN API program, view Gardner’s WSO2Con USA 2015 presentation.

To understand more about BNY Mellon, check out ‘A History of BNY Mellon’ on Youtube.

WSO2Con Asia 2016 – highlights, pictures and turkey tweets!

Last week we concluded WSO2Con Asia 2016 with a bang! Over 250 attendees from across the region joined us, making it our biggest user conference to date.

We had inspiring keynotes, customer stories and technical sessions ranging from analytics and API management to cloud and integration. We also had lots of fun like twitter competitions and after parties.

Here’s a recap on some of our most memorable moments…

Day 1 was dedicated to tutorials. The sessions provided hands-on experience and deep dives into key WSO2 products. The ones on microservices and IoT were specially popular.

Tutorials

The official start of the conference however, was day 2 where the punchy sounds of Sachintha and the Beat Drummers kicked things off at the opening ceremony.

WSO2ConAsia-2016Opening

This was followed by the opening keynote by WSO2 Founder, CEO and Chief Architect Dr. Sanjiva Weerawarana. In his usual flair Sanjiva talked about WSO2’s progress in the past 10 years and how the WSO2 platform is being used by customers across industries such as  transport, government, entertainment, mobile and more. He also spoke about WSO2’s vision for the connected enterprise and its future in the middleware industry.

Sanjiva

Other keynotes for the day included an engaging presentation on Vega, the high performance electric sports car being developed in Sri Lanka. Dr. Harsha Subasinghe, the president and CEO of Codegen, and Dr. Beshan Kulapala, a research scientist at Codegen highlighted the challenges and opportunities in leading complex engineering projects to success.

Codegen

Dr. Frank Leymann, a director in the Institute of Architecture of Application Systems at University of Stuttgart, discussed loose coupling and its implications on microservice and cloud native architectures.

Frank Leymann

Isabelle Mauny, the vice president of product management at WSO2, gave the final keynote for the day on how analytics can improve customer experiences. Interestingly the phrase “Turkeys” was trending on our twitter dashboard during her talk!

The day continued with dedicated tracks running in parallel on cloud, API management, security and integration.

Several customers shared their experiences and how they have used the WSO2 Platform to effectively meet their technical and business goals.

Harshavardhan Mohanraj and Praveen Doddamani, technical leads at ZeOmega, spoke about how they leveraged the WSO2 platform to build a healthcare solution while improving component manageability and standardizing security in the API Management Track.

Zeomega

Ibrahim Khalil, a system integration analyst and team lead at Capgemini, spoke about how they leveraged their experience with United Nations agencies and built a vertical solution, enabled by WSO2 products, for UN organizations in the Cloud Track.

Ibrahim Khalili

Gina Keune, the team lead of integration and configuration at Royal Automobile Association, shared the challenges they faced and wins they celebrated when incrementally adopting SOA using WSO2.

Gina Keune

Charith De Silva, a lead architect at WSO2.Telco, introduced WSO2.Telco IDS which provides a fully Mobile Connect (OIDC) compliant solution for telcos embarking on a federated ID strategy.

Charith De Silva

This year we also hosted a special Strategy Forum for CxOs which saw attendees from companies such as Honeywell, NYU, John Keells Holdings, zMessenger, LOLC and more. The forum was led by WSO2 VP of Solutions Architecture Asanka Abeysinghe who spoke about the digital transformation of enterprise platforms.

Strategy Forum

The day ended with a networking event featuring smooth jazz tunes provided by Brown Sugar. Tasteful bites accompanied by cocktails coupled with lounge-like seating made it the perfect environment to catch up with industry experts and peers.

Networking event

The third and final day of the conference was also packed with insightful technical sessions. The tracks covered topics on governance, IT consumerization, analytics, devOps and app development.

The session on microservices attracted over a 100 of the attendees and proved to be one of the most popular talks of the day.

Azeez

Another popular talk was by Kiran Kumar, an enterprise architect at Wipro, who discussed a case study of a governance system where service governance meets API governance.

Kiran Kumar

The technical sessions came to an end with a closing keynote by Asanka and panel discussion on the benefits and effects of creating a digital enterprise.

Asanka Panel

In addition to the technical sessions, a team led by Srinath Perera, vice president of research at WSO2, showcased capabilities of the WSO2 Analytics platform by hooking up with Twitter to create a sentiment analyser. The project which tracked #wso2conasia was able to give valuable insights into sessions and popular topics. It also helped identify the most dedicated tweep, who walked away with a GoPro camera for his contributions.

Sentiment analysis

Sumedha Rubasinghe, director of API architecture at WSO2 also ran a project that combined  Google’s voice API with the soon to be released WSO2 IoT Server which displayed what speakers of each session were talking about.  This was just a sampling of what you can expect in the future with WSO2’s IoT Platform.

Voice Analyser

Source: Readme.LK

In true WSO2 style, WSO2Con Asia 2016 came to a close with a rocking after-party featuring the band Glory.

Party

In the coming weeks we’ll be sharing more details of the presentations, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime you can check out the slides for all sessions at the WSO2Con Asia website.

WSO2Con Insights – How APIs are Driving StubHub’s Business

Transforming a business to an API-centric architecture is a major undertaking, but it’s one that yields many benefits, most notably the ability to grow the business by extending processes to partners. In his keynote presentation at WSO2Con US 2013, Sastry Malladi, chief architect for StubHub, explained how the company has implemented an API-centric architecture to capitalize on this opportunity.

According to Malladi, adopting an API-centric architecture was driven by two factors. First, the company wants to expand from an online marketplace for tickets to become an end-to-destination for fans, including sharing their event experiences and getting information about things to do in event locales. Second, StubHub, which currently has a presence in three countries, plans to expand worldwide.

He observed that to achieve this goal, StubHub needed to build a developer community and enable partners to bring their content and services to the StubHub audience.

For example, Malladi noted, “If you’re at a hotel, and say you want to do something this evening to a concierge—how do we integrate those? You need to go to places where people are instead of expecting them to come to your site.”

Reusable Components Are Key to API Architecture

Sastry-at-WSO2ConUS-2013-2Before StubHub could extend APIs to partners, Malladi told attendees, the company first had to break down StubHub’s monolithic, hardwired application into shared, usable components, or services. This was necessary, he explained, because an API is an externally exposed “service,” which includes a developer program and typically has a “functional” contact as well as a “non-functional” contract, such as a service-level agreement (SLA). Moreover, the API potentially maybe orchestrated across multiple services, he said.

As part of this effort, Malladi explained, StubHub has established a domain meta model in which each domain is separate and independent and has one or more functions; each of these functions can have one or more APIs, but there is a one-to-one relationship between an API and an endpoint. Additionally, he said, the StubHub team does dependency modeling, so when someone is developing a function or API, the dependency is understood. Finally, he explained that domains are done in such a way that the entities belonging to a domain are owned by that domain, and the only way to access those entities is by going through the domain.

“Bottom line,” Malladi noted, “These APIs are giving us the business agility that we need and the operational excellence.”

API Architecture Opportunities Vs. Challenges

Malladi observed that an API-centric architecture offers several benefits for StubHub in addition to business agility:

  • Sellers have the flexibility to build their own customized solutions, and systems scale well to inventory and traffic.
  • Buyer experiences are enhanced, since it allows the developer community to extend the StubHub fan experience.
  • API brands serve to drive revenue and increase visibility.
  • Developers are encouraged to explore the APIs and see what they can accomplish with them.

However, becoming an API-centric organization presents challenges as well.

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Malladi noted that while a new business could start from scratch, an established company, such as StubHub needed to balance the re-architecture with meeting other commitments to the business and customers.

A second challenge according to Malladi is that consumption patterns are not fully “baked” at the time of building an API; you won’t know fully who is going to consume them and what their patterns will be. Similarly, chargeback models and SLAs will not be clearly baked at first.

That is why it is important to build the API in such a way that it is flexible and can adapt to changes, he said. Moreover, exposing APIs to a lot of partners is not free, so architects and developers need to incorporate capacity planning and accountability into their models, he added.

At the same time, fraudsters are looking to make money off of Internet business sites. For this reason, companies need to be able to detect and prevent them from leveraging the API, and impersonating and collecting confidential data, Malladi advised.

The Role of WSO2 API Manager

For its own API architecture, StubHub is using the Store and Publisher in WSO2 API Manager, WSO2-api-manager-logoAPI Gateway based on WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus, and WSO2 Identity Server, Malladi said. The Publisher is where internal team members publish their APIs and manage the lifecycle of the APIs, he explained.

The Store is where an API is exposed both to the external and internal consumers, so they can create their applications. Malladi noted that the Store works the same way both internally and externally on both the website and mobile apps. He also invited attendees to visit StubHub’s implementation of the Store, the Developer Portal, at https://developer.StubHub.com.

WSO2 Identity Server manages user authentication, key management, JSON Web Token (JWT) assertion, Malladi said. Meanwhile, the WSO2 ESB-based API Gateway routes all incoming requests and works with WSO2 Identity Server to authenticate them.

Malladi noted that the combination of WSO2 API Manager and WSO2 ESB has enabled StubHub to address the need to manage APIs across Web and mobile domains. This is an important feature, since mobile is where StubHub sees the biggest growth, he explained.

Big Data Insights into APIs

To support StubHub and its expanded business model, the company is creating a big data platform to answer key questions, Malladi said. For example: How does the API manage social data and business analytics? How do StubHub APIs use these data sources, process the data, and bring it back in real time?

“It’s not just about creating an API but how it works on the backend,” Malladi observed. ““It’s so important to understand who your customer is and what they are doing.”

As Malladi then closed his session, he noted that building an API-centric architecture is a key driver for business growth, but as with any initiative there are challenges as well.

“The good news is you aren’t alone,” Malladi said. “And there are solutions.”

For more information about StubHub’s process for creating APIs, you can view Malladi’s WSO2Con US 2013 keynote address.

 

WSO2 Mashup Server–where to now?

mashup_logoYou may have noticed the WSO2 Mashup Server link has been retired from our menus, and seen that the WSO2 Mashup Server page on wso2.com directs you to the WSO2 Application Server product page.  Curious as to what’s going on?  Here’s the whole story, from inception to the present and looking towards the future.

Where the WSO2 Mashup Server led the way

I joined WSO2 back in 2006 as Director of Architecture for Mashup Technologies to explore ways to make the emerging stack of WS-* specifications approachable and efficient for the average Web developer.  The result was the WSO2 Mashup Server, which introduced a number of valuable ideas and features:

  • Expose simple Javascript functions as full-fledged SOAP Web services, bringing Web developer skills into the enterprise.
  • Simplify access to SOAP Web services from within Javascript (mashups or browser).
  • Make dealing with XML payloads easier.
  • Interface with other systems that Web developers are interested in, particularly feeds, data sources, and other web pages.
  • Build a try-it functionality allowing developers to point at a WSDL and get a usable form-based user interface to explore a Web service (or to provide a default user interface for any service.)
  • Make the results available in forms a Web developer cares about: web pages, gadget portals, feeds, instant messages, email messages.
  • Seed an ecosystem of reusable mashups by building community features into a multi-tenant environment, where each mashup exposes services that can be reused and recombined.
  • Host a public site (mooshup.com) for the mashup community.

The resulting product, the WSO2 Mashup Server, broke new ground and gained a lot of interest in the community, proving the value of
many of these ideas.  Here’s what the 1.x version looked like back then:image

These core features and ideas have over time influenced the WSO2 Carbon platform.  As more of these ideas have been incorporated broadly into the platform, the layer unique to the Mashup Server has become increasingly small.  Here are some ways the Mashup Server informed WSO2 Carbon platform evolution:

  • Multi-tenancy.  The early multi-tenancy (really more of multi-user than full isolation) in the Mashup Server allowed many users to register, author and share their own mashups with others, has evolved into a full multi-tenant architecture across the Carbon system, and has been a core feature cloud-enabling the WSO2 Stratos Platform-as-a-Service.
  • Social enterprise.  Enabling community features like tags, ratings, comments, granular feeds and search embedded those capacities into the underlying WSO2 Governance Registry.  They remain a key part of our governance capabilities and continue to evolve through initiatives such as the WSO2 API Manager’s API Store interface.
  • Try-it. Try-it for SOAP services has been integrated into all our products that focus on exposing services.  I personally think we have lost a bit of the “default user interface” focus over time and hope to push us back to regain and extend that aspect of developer experimentation, but an increasing preference for RESTful services which can be readily explored through simple tools like Curl is making that less urgent.
  • Gadgets.  The Google gadget dashboard and gadget generators made their first appearance as a component of the WSO2 Mashup Server, but were fairly quickly spun out into a separate product.
  • WSO2 Carbon.  It’s my view that WSO2 Mashup Server became in large part the straw that broke the back of the camel of a suite of related, but separately developed, products.  With many capabilities and shared components between WSO2 Mashup Server, WSO2 Data Services Server, WSO2 Governance Registry, WSO2 Gadget Server, coordinated development and releases across these products became untenable and helped motivate the hard but incredibly valuable work of moving towards the world’s first fully componentized middleware platform.
  • WSO2 StratosLive.  The multi-user publicly hosted WSO2 Mashup Server branded as mooshup.com site became redundant as the whole WSO2 Carbon platform emerged through WSO2 StratosLive as a solid public middleware PaaS encompassing the whole range of WSO2 products.  Mooshup.com was retired quite a while back when StratosLive came online.

What remains unique to the Mashup Server at this point is limited to the hosting of Javascript Web Services.

As our WSO2 Application Server product has expanded to encompass a platform for hosting a larger variety of web service and web application types, it makes sense to simply include Javascript services among that set.  So even though there is no longer a separate download for the WSO2 Mashup Server, the capabilities available in the final release remain present in the WSO2 Application Server.

Where the WSO2 Mashup Server missed the boat

It’s worthwhile to review some of the areas where the Mashup Server failed to reach the mainstream.  As a SOAP-centric and XML-centric model, it lost some relevancy as RESTful services and JSON have dominated the API ecosystem targeted at Web developers.  The Mashup Server’s focuses on APIs didn’t provide an easy environment for developing Web Applications – many Web Apps I built on as mashups were comprised of static HTML pages, AJAX and XML, without dynamic HTML creation and relying completely on AJAX to invoke any kind of server-side processing.  Not always the most straightfoward solution.

To address these needs, we’ve got a new approach.  Jaggery is a server-side Javascript framework, that allows the Web App or mobile developer to use the same models on the client and server sides: HTML, Javascript, and JSON.  Jaggery makes it easy both to generate dynamic web pages, but also to expose RESTful services.  It brings native JSON processing to the server side and thus makes it much easier to author Web/mobile clients and services and for them to work seamlessly together.

So if you’re using the WSO2 Mashup Server, you’ll find an easy transition to the WSO2 Application Server and I’m confident you’ll find this aggregation to be a straightforward and positive move.  And we encourage you to expand your ability to leverage the advantages of Javascript server-side development with Jaggery.

Jonathan Marsh
Vice President of Business Development
blog: http://jonathanmarsh.net/blog

After Sonic ESB pioneered, WSO2 ESB continuously innovated

After Sonic ESB pioneered the Enterprise Service Bus market and created technology to more readily integrate applications using Enterprise Integration Patterns, WSO2 continually added innovations to the core ESB pattern and created the highest performance, lowest footprint, fully interoperable and flexible ESB, WSO2 ESB.

Progress Software recently lowered their sights on supporting enterprise integration developers, and Progress is has publicly announced intent to sell Progress Sonic ESB, Actional services management, and FuseSource. Progress’ recent strategy shift places Sonic ESB, Sonic MQ, Actional, and FuseSource customers at risk of further obsolescence.

Where did Progress’ corporate strategy fail? By growing through ad-hoc acquisition and superficial integration instead of organic platform development. Progress played a failing game espoused by IBM, Oracle, and Software AG. Progress acquired competitive threats and then invested the minimal amount required to create a ‘SOA Suite’. As often the case, the strategy led to multiple overlapping products, competing business units, lost internal talent,
and a disjointed customer experience.

At WSO2, we have consistently taken a different approach. Our complete, composable, and cohesive platform was built through organic development, which continually enhances our core platform, incorporates market-leading innovations, and delivers a seamless customer experience. Our WSO2 Enterprise Platform enables complete data to screen enterprise integration, SOA, BPM, API management, web application development, and Cloud.

Our WSO2 ESB, WSO2 Governance Registry, WSO2 Business Activity Monitor, and WSO2 Identity Server provide a production proven, high performance SOA middleware foundation. We welcome you review our case studies and learn how WSO2 ESB processes more than 1 billion transactions per day for eBay, streamlines the development and maintenance of smart power grids, supports T24 core banking systems, and enables consolidated reporting across
enterprise applications.

Our Offer to Progress Sonic ESB and Progress FuseSource Customers

WSO2 desires to assist Progress Sonic ESB and Progress FuseSource customers choose a viable, stable, and supported middleware platform. We are offering free Evaluation Support to current Progress Sonic ESB and Progress FuseSource customers, and would be pleased to demonstrate how our market leading WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus and WSO2 SOA Platform meets your evaluation criteria. Feel free to contact us via our Progress customer offer landing page, our contact form or send us an email note.

Chris Haddad, VP Technology Evangelism Chris’s blog: http://blog.cobia.net/cobiacomm/