Enterprise Architects Appreciate “Lean”

Standing out from our conversations with dozens of Enterprise Architects at last week’s Forrester Enterprise Architecture Summit 2011 in San Francisco was the interest in and appreciation of “lean” approaches to integration challenges.  From a lot of nodding in the room after Paul’s assertion that a lean solution was a key factor in eBay’s choice to use the WSO2 ESB in their ultra-scale deployments, to expo floor conversations with Enterprise Architects who are tired of suffering under bloated old industrial middleware and perking up at the idea that this is not inevitable, I came away with the impression that we may be on the cusp of a “lean” wave.

The cloud descends on San Francisco for the Forrester EA Summit 2011 [Jonathan Marsh from the Golden Gate Bridge 2/16/2011]

Let me be clear, while the WSO2 Carbon platform is lean it’s not skinny.  Through a sophisticated componentization model based on OSGi, there are hundreds of features to choose from, comprising a complete middleware platform from data to screen.  You just don’t typically need them all at once.

What are some of the factors that are driving the lean movement? I think they include:

  • Simplified installation, configuration, and provisioning.
  • Low resource use, specifically modest disk and memory footprints.
  • High performance as a result of a simple straight-line approach to the problem at hand.
  • Immense productivity and reliability gains which occur when a tool addresses the problem at hand directly, not through multiple layers of generalization and abstraction.

This lean mentality kind of reminds me of my Microsoft days during which Windows Server Data Center Edition was introduced.  DC is essentially a version of Windows Server stripped down to its leanest, most performant and secure core.  It surprised me at the time that they charged significantly more for less actual code.  But it does demonstrate the value proposition of “lean,” and why it may now be a trending topic in the field of Enterprise Architecture.

Jonathan Marsh, VP Business Development and Marketing
Jonathan’s blog: http://jonathanmarsh.net/blog