Open Banking Implementations in Europe and Africa: The Story of Société Générale (So Far)

Investment and retail bank Société Générale has its headquarters in Paris, France plus 45 branches in 36 countries, representing over 18 million customers globally. Retail banking services support 3 business lines in the regions of Europe, Africa and the Mediterranean, and Russia. Their 2020 strategic plan is simply named “Transform to Grow.” Open is the keyword here. “We want an open approach to develop offers and client satisfaction,” says Jean-Louis Rocchisani, enterprise architect at Société Générale.

The Transformative Powers of Open Banking

Open banking plays a crucial role in Société Générale’s transformative approach to business growth. Their open banking journey started in 2015, having recognized the opportunities it presents for improving the time-to-market and reforming their business model. Their open banking efforts have not passed by unnoticed. Recently, Société Générale was selected as the most advanced company out of 44 listed companies in the French market. After investing in the needed architecture, Société Générale now looking to extend towards the bank as a platform model.

Société Générale also sees the the transformative power of technology and APIs in its future. “We’re currently in the proprietary model, but we see the opportunities to increase our distribution power by creating a smooth digital end-to-end process,” says Jean-Louis. “We’re also looking to monetize our services and most importantly, create interactions between service producers and customers – which is also quite hard to launch. But this is possible because we have APIs as a product.”

Société Générale is guided by open banking drivers in the many parts of the world that they operate in. These include PSD2 compliance and beyond in Europe, modernizing B2B2C models, and enhancing digital banking services (as is the case in Africa). Community plays a central role in Société Générale’s open banking efforts, as markets are different and evolving across countries, and working with local communities of financial service providers is essential.

Jean-Louis presenting at WSO2Con EU

How Société Générale Came Across WSO2 Open Banking

Société Générale and WSO2 have a strategic partnership that dates back to 2015, ever since the first successful implementation. Their first success story and the fact that WSO2 is open source were major deciding factors for Société Générale. SOSMART is the acronym for Société Générale’s architecture principles which are sustainable, open, modular and real-time, and API first. They were looking for a technology partner who would accompany them for the entirety of their open banking journey. WSO2 Open Banking provides the technology for open APIs, secure integration with banks and third parties, and integration analytics capabilities. “WSO2 has innovative products, efficient people, and a shared vision with us,” explains Jean-Louis.

Use Cases From Africa and Europe

Germany: This was the first use case implemented by Société Générale and is centered on equipment finance, financing for big customers through vendors. This project began by implementing a B2B2C platform using WSO2 Open Banking, using the support from local vendors. This platform is now extended to include international vendors as well, using a federated model rather than a shared one to improve its efficiency.

Czech Republic: A large bank in the Czech Republic needed to leverage PSD2 towards open APIs, using WSO2 Open Banking. The bank is now working with fintech developers and partners in the country, using the API platform which was launched. This bank is looking to close the gap between iteration and deployment and they’re satisfied with their progress so far.

Africa: Société Générale works on innovations to digital and mobile banking rather than regulatory compliance in their African business operations. They currently have 12 banks in Africa, all of whom are different despite sharing the same core banking system and is therefore difficult to scale use cases from one country to another. An API layer has reduced the time to market, and the next stage is to open this platform to fintechs and other service providers in the ecosystem.

France: Société Générale’s French overseas territories banks have to achieve PSD2 compliance. In spite of the tight deadline, Société Générale believes this can be achieved on time and are using WSO2 Open Banking to speed up the implementation.

What’s Next?

With experience gained from a string of successes, Société Générale has more exciting projects lined up together with WSO2 Open Banking. For Jean-Louis, technology is an enabler (and not a constraint) and he says, “We believe in an interoperable world, where technology opens up possibilities leading to more success stories.”

Listen to Jean-Louis’s complete presentation in this video.

WSO2 Open Banking helps you achieve regulatory compliance in Europe and Australia, with successful use cases from around the world. Learn all about its capabilities here.

A Year in Identity

We’re looking at the possibilities of 2019, and after spending one year as the product marketing manager for WSO2 Identity Server, here are some observations I’ve made as to why enterprises would need identity and access management (IAM).

Identity is more than SSO, it’s a key enabler for Integration Agility

Throughout 2018, we kept hearing how identity should be treated as something more than merely a security project at every identity conference we took part in. We have to go back to our enterprises and say why identity is the glue that holds it all together. Single sign-on (SSO0, authentication or securing APIs, would come off a simple task or singular project but it all eventually becomes a part of a much larger project, like integration. Customer identity and access management (CIAM) is a great example of integration. You use identity, API management, and integration components along with analytics to give users a fantastic user experience. So whatever your enterprise strategy may be, identity plays a key role in being future-proof and it’s more than just logging into applications.

Your customer comes first

CIAM, which may appear as a trend, should be the ultimate goal for any enterprise. Most customers that we deal with use WSO2 Identity Server for CIAM through SSO, identity federation, etc. CIAM helps to give your users a unified experience. An example is West Corporation, who does an excellent job of giving their customers a connected experience.

We’re moving from multi factor authentication to adaptive authentication for the very same reason, to help you make your user’s life secure and better.

There’s an API for that

Everything today is API driven. All businesses are inclined to expose their APIs and the rate of exploding endpoints is surely alarming. Yet, what would be the point if these are not secure?

Open source IAM is “still” an emerging concept and this should change

Although open source might not be the most known option for IAM, it should be. A lot of people assume that open source means free, but it’s the “freedom” to try the product, to scan and test the code as you please and NOT being “locked-in” to a vendor. It’s also easy to innovate fast with open source and it’s versatile because of the variety of authenticators and connectors. One of my team-mates illustrated this quite brilliantly on Quora.

Therefore if one were to choose an IAM solution for their enterprise, I strongly urge to give open source a try.

Privacy

It takes a situation like Cambridge Analytica for enterprises to take IAM seriously. With the rise of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the upcoming California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), user consent and privacy are taking the precedence over everything and we fully support this. IAM is wired to provide compliance so that users are secure and businesses can make use of this opportunity to demonstrate that they are “user-centric” and prioritize privacy over everything. This way you maximize user retention too.

Some final thoughts

2018 has been a fantastic learning curve, also because I get to work with the best in the industry (both in Marketing and Engineering/IAM). One such person is Prabath Siriwardena, who is a walking encyclopedia of all things identity (check out his blog, you’ll learning something you didn’t know).

Here’s to a data breach free 2019!

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You can read more blogs posts from me here. I also Tweet and get in touch with me @fishfaceishi

Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish: Solving Diverse Integration Needs to Help Students and Instructors Better

Macmillan Learning is a leader in the education publishing and EdTech industries, with a target market of over 9,000 colleges and 50,000 high schools in USA and Canada. Their partnerships with many of the world’s best researchers, educators, and administrators, as well as their emphasis on top quality content drive their business. Macmillan Learning teamed up with Ribbonfish, who specializes in offering service solutions to the media and publishing industries, to answer the changing needs of the education industry – helping both students and instructors improve their outcomes.

A Technology Strategy for an Evolving Industry

Macmillan Learning observed how the education industry has been evolving over the years and realized that they need a strategy to answer to the rapid developments that are taking place in this industry. Key among their goals was responding to market needs faster and providing students with interactive digital solutions to support their education.

However, the education industry is a seasonal one and Macmillan Learning wanted to ensure their new solutions caused the least amount of disruption, particularly during peak times. Another important consideration was the internal organizational structure. “You can’t develop a technology strategy in isolation, we need to be mindful of both the structure and culture of an organization. The culture needs to be improved, particularly when partnering with others and the structure needs to be standardized across the various teams,” says Sagar Bujbal, VP technology at Macmillan Learning.

Like any other business, Macmillan Learning integrates with many disparate systems. “Around 60 to 80% of your time is spent on supporting these various systems, rather than concentrating on innovation. When thinking about the right solutions implement, we really need to quantify the strengths and weaknesses of each of these systems,” says Paul King, a solutions architect at Ribbonfish. Both Paul and Sagar stress on the point that seamless integration in such a context requires architectural guardrails and governance. They explain that a well-defined target reference architecture (prior to development) with a long term vision, taking into account changes that will have to be encountered over the years, is a solid starting point. Best practices and utilizing out-of-box platform capabilities are further requirements for seamless integration.

Sagar and Paul presenting at WSO2Con USA

Selecting the Right Technology

Both Sagar and Paul believe that an enterprise integration platform is one of the most strategic technology decisions that a business makes. They were looking to build a target reference architecture that was business driven, rather than focusing on a particular technology and evaluated several technology vendors based on this. Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish considered factors such as platform capabilities, maturity of the product, type of agility provided for developers, quality of production support, costs, and the vendor’s willingness to work closely with a business to solve their particular needs. Both were of the view that WSO2 Enterprise Integrator, with its integration runtimes, message brokering, business process modeling, and analytics capabilities, catered to their requirements.

Achieving Seamless Integration

Given the fact that integration needs at Macmillan Learning were diverse, Sagar and Paul decided on APIs as the de-facto standard for integrating all their systems. They also made sure that there was no direct coupling. Their current architecture includes the Macmillan Learning integration layer composed of WSO2 Enterprise Integrator along with Salesforce. Paul explains that one of their main goals when building the new architecture was to not over complicate things and using WSO2 helped, “One of the big things we really took from it when we selected WSO2 as a platform and service was that there are plenty of solutions within WSO2 itself.”

Paul and Sagar state that documenting the inventory of business processes and interactions contributed a lot to their success, as it helped them to better define their target reference architecture. They also believe that defining their integration techniques, constant communication with their engineering team, and weekly reviews of what they implemented helped them immensely.

More innovation is planned for Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish. The huge scale of transformation at Macmillan Learning means that there is a continuous demand to meet these requirements. Proactive customer service plays a key role in this transformation. Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish gain insights from interactions between customer care agents, students, and instructors to improve this transformation process and customer satisfaction. And as mentioned earlier, they will continue to review what they do for the best possible outcomes.

To learn more about how Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish are working together, watch this video:

Everything you need to learn about WSO2 Enterprise Integrator is here.

Veridium Develops World-Class Biometric Federated Authenticator for WSO2 Identity Server

Founded in 2016, Veridium is a provider of identity and access management software with a focus on biometrics. As a company, Veridium has essentially one goal: to protect organizations by reducing or eliminating identity as a major threat. It does this by replacing vulnerable passwords and tokens with biometric authentication. In other words, Veridium replaces what you know (passwords) and what you have (tokens) with what you are – your biometrics.

The Ascendency of Biometrics

Biometrics are fast replacing passwords and tokens as the go-to authentication method used by organizations looking to increase security and reduce fraud. This strategy is backed by research. According to a recent report by Verizon, 63 percent of data breaches could have been stopped if an alternative to passwords had been in place.

Veridium is at the forefront of the development of innovative biometrics-based platforms and has a global customer base representing a wide range of sectors including financial services, healthcare, government, and law enforcement all of whom have put their trust in Veridium’s password-free, single-step, frictionless biometric login.

Veridium offers its customers three flagship products: VeridiumID, VeridiumAD and 4 Fingers TouchlessID. VeridiumID is a server-side protocol for biometric authentication that works with a user’s smartphone. It is easily installed within a customer’s network and can provide authentication to enterprise applications, websites and even doors. VeridiumAD is an enterprise-ready solution that increases the security and convenience of Microsoft Active Directory access by replacing passwords with biometric authentication. Finally, Veridium’s trademarked 4 Fingers TouchlessID is an innovative new biometric that captures four prints simultaneously, providing unprecedented levels of security.

John presenting at WSO2Con USA

Effortless Integration of Veridium’s Biometrics with WSO2 Identity Server

Knowing that WSO2 Identity Server accommodated several different biometric configurations including primary authentication, 2FA, MFA or escalated transactions, Veridium first approached WSO2 to see how WSO2 Identity Server could enhance Veridium’s product offerings. John Callahan, Veridium’s Chief Technology Officer, was astounded by the ease by which his company was able to integrate with WSO2 Identity Server. Calling the integration, “one of the simplest things,” John said it took a single developer less than a month to create and execute the federated authenticator.

The result of the integration is the Veridium Authenticator (VA), a biometric authenticator developed to work with WSO2 Identity Server. The VA is IEEE 2410-2017 certified and provides biometric SSO capabilities for most iOS and Android devices using facial, voice and its proprietary 4Fingers™ recognition. VA comes with a vanilla app that is available for iOS and Android. It can also be embedded in customers’ existing apps via their software development kit. By securely linking users and their devices to their digital identities, Veridium’s innovative software-only MFA solution allows for improved and enhanced authentication.

Speaking about the collaboration between Veridium and WSO2 Identity Server, John says that “they just go well together.” Because the two companies share a common vision for the future where single sign-on (SSO) is either through SAML or Open ID Connect (OIDC) and there is movement towards API development, it is no surprise to him that the companies’ product offerings are in perfect alignment.

User-centric Biometric Authentication

The VA offers two types of single sign-on: QR-code and push notification. Both sign-on methods are part of the Biometric Open Protocol Standard (BOPS), the only protocol that specifies the use of an end-to-end system for authentication. In QR mode, a time-sensitive QR code is generated which the user scans and is then prompted for one or more biometric authenticators on their mobile phone. In push mode, the service provider (SP) redirection includes identity information for sending a push notification to the user’s mobile phone where they are then asked for biometric authentication. Successful authentication (for both sign-on methods), results in authorization via SAML or OIDC redirection back to the SP.

Identity and access management (IAM) is an evolving space. Callahan predicts an ascendency in biometrics as, in his words, “devices get scarily good at knowing it is you, and your device and [that] you are the one authenticating.” As the volume and intensity of cyber attacks increases, developers have to be more innovative and agile in their approach to authentication in order to provide their customers with the best protection. The collaboration between Veridium and WSO2 Identity Server in the form of the Veridium Authenticator is a perfect example of the type of forward thinking, adaptive authentication that will characterize the identity landscape of the future.

Watch John’s presentation to learn more about how Veridium and WSO2 worked together.

Everything you need to know about WSO2 Identity Server is here.

WSO2: Our 2018 Results and 2019 Plan

10th straight year of subscription growth!

WSO2 had a stellar 2018 fiscal year. Continuing with the tradition began last year of financial transparency, I am pleased to share WSO2’s 2018 financial achievements and our 2019 plans.

WSO2 is starting our 14th year of operations. As our technology has become accepted as the best for open source integration, our business has started to grow at an increasing rate.

10th straight year of subscription growth; financial sound operations

WSO2 Subscriptions is our primary business. Customers purchase subscriptions to get support with an SLA, patches, security scanning, and developer query time. Subscriptions are purchased annually and are renewable. We use SaaS-style metrics and Annualized Recurring Revenue (ARR) as the benchmark for measuring the scale of our product sales.

In 2018, we exited with $37M in ARR, an expected growth of over 51% year-over-year. We added over 100 new subscription customers. We have more than 525 customers that have purchased a subscription or other professional services from us.

We now have customers in 65 different countries and in 2018, we crossed a milestone where more than 50% of our product sales originate outside North America. By the end of 2019, 65% of our business will reside outside North America making WSO2 a truly international-first business.

Financially, WSO2 is strong. We increased our balance sheet by $3.5M from operating cash flows while substantially increasing our staffing, opening new offices in Berlin, Mexico, and Australia, and continue long-term investments into next generation technologies like Ballerina.

WSO2 flirts around with GAAP profitability. We have profitable quarters, but don’t get there annually. Subscription businesses recognize revenue ratably over a 12 month period causing the revenue benefit from sales to appear delayed. This behavior is why we emphasize cash flow from operations as a better reflection of our business’ financial profitability.

Last year, WSO2 was the 8th largest pure open source software company. Given our growth rate, WSO2 is now the 6th largest open source company and we anticipate growing into the 5th over the next year!

WSO2 in 2019

In 2018, most of the changes that were made to the business were driven by territory expansion, globalizing our sales organization, expanding our field quality initiatives, and revamping our partner programs to capitalize on the dramatic increase in demand that we have seen in emerging markets.

In 2019, we will accelerate these initiatives while introducing a significant evolution of our product and open source initiatives.

We expect to grow 45–65% in 2019, exiting the year with more than 750 customers across 80 countries. We anticipate Latin America, Africa, and APAC to be the highest growth segments.

We’ll hire ~150 people through the year and expect to have close to 700 full time employees by year’s end.

For 2019, all WSO2 employees contributed to our strategic planning, and we have developed the WSO2 2019 vision; a commitment and description of our values, goals and strategies that will be driving our core efforts.

WSO2 2019: Our internal framework that helps us keep our priorities straight

WSO2’s 2019 Strategies and Priorities

When WSO2 was started, it was an experiment of middleware, integration and open source ideas. Those ideas unlocked a form of unanticipated profitability and prosperous employee base. We look back and then ask:

Could openness be a radical, more scalable, more profitable approach to integration software and business? How would WSO2 practice an open integration business alongside our open source licensing?

We use this mindset to collectively identify our strategic priorities for this year. Internally, we describe these efforts as Unifying Integration, Proving Ballerina, Win In Every Country, Open Everything, Agility Thought Leadership, and Culture of Transparency.

From a customer and investor perspective, we will:

  1. Launch New, Community-Driven Open Source Projects. We have written extensively on the evolution of integration; the need for the composable enterprise, standardizing reference architectures for integrations, and how microservices are shifting integration into code-first, instead of config-first capabilities. To further these ideas, we have community-driven efforts underway on new open source efforts including Cellery, Siddhi, a micro ESB, and a micro identity server. We will make public introductions as these efforts are readied for enterprise adoption.
  2. Invest Deeper Into API Management, IAM, and ESB. WSO2 is the industry-recognized leader in open source API management and IAM. We are one of the most widely adopted ESBs and recognized for the 1000s of enterprise integration projects we support. We are significantly expanding our engineering and dedicated support in these domains, effectively doubling our capacity by the end of 2019.
  3. Open WSO2 Hidden IP. We have pockets of intellectual property that is closed because we have the repositories hidden. This includes our cloud operating IP, certain types of configuration, and internal systems. Technically, our marketing, support, and sales content is not open either. We will open source all of this hidden IP.
  4. Open More of our Company Practices. We are expanding our partner network and simplifying how outsiders can participate with WSO2 in development, delivery and sales. We expect to grant 1000 certifications throughout 2019 and double the number of outside contributors to WSO2 projects and contributions made by WSO2 to external open source projects.
  5. Establish WSO2 as Open Source Champions. When outsiders engage in an open process started by someone else, they are joining a community. A community is a collection of people who share similar values. Committing to an open business model, in turn, means that we are advocates for community. We open our doors so that others may walk through. WSO2 will work on programs that make it easier for new developers to become participants in open source, create courses about how to run your own open source projects, and hiring dedicated staff that will be open source community champions within and outside WSO2.

We are working to be the best integration-at-scale provider for layered and cloud native architectures

About Those Lawyers

All this means we can, and will, create a lot more open source that helps IT digitize assets, become increasingly agile, and help turn internal software development into a competitive advantage.

We will be working to turn WSO2 into an IT-household brand, bringing our form of integration into every application and service you are building. If you are new to WSO2 or open source, 2019 will be a great year for you to learn more about how we can help you solve your digitization, integration, identity or API challenges. I’m happy to guide you on your journey and you can get in touch with me directly at tyler@wso2.com.

. . .

Since this blog post includes future operating plans, predictions, estimates, and forecasts, this is a good time to point out that we have lawyers, and that our lawyers want you to know that this information represents our current judgment on what the future holds and it is subject to risks, uncertainties, and other nightmares. In other words, don’t draw conclusions that have undue reliance on this blog post and understand that we may revise anything.

NewWave Taps API-driven Innovations to Develop Federally Compliant Healthcare Microservices for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is a federal agency in the United States Department of Health and Human Services that administers the Medicare program and works with state governments to administer Medicaid. It is the single largest payer for healthcare in the United States and provides services to over 130 million Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries. Creating a stream of relevant and timely applications and products to service their significant customer base, while ensuring compliance with federal IT regulations, poses enormous challenges to CMS.

Traditionally, it takes several hundreds of hours of manual coding to develop an application that meets the federal government’s 3-zone architecture requirement. The process is so laborious and time consuming that the solution being developed often risks being obsolete before it has even deployed. Fortunately, CMS’ healthcare technology partner, NewWave, has devised an API-based solution that develops and deploys federally compliant healthcare microservices at hyper speed.

NewWave’s mission is to work with their clients to modernize their businesses and empower them to use technology in new ways. Donghwa Kim, director of application engineering at NewWave, says, “When we solve problems, we constantly remind ourselves of three things – people, processes, and tools. And of all three, people always comes first.” In keeping with this mission, the challenge of technological obsolescence at CMS was a natural fit for the company.

Donghwa discussing this solution at WSO2Con USA

Powered by Flexible APIs

Using API-driven innovations, NewWave developed SmartApp, a powerful development accelerator that streamlines application start-up and delivery at CMS. NewWave compared several vendors and settled on the open source WSO2 API Manager, as it had all the features they required for the new solution, which above-all needed to be flexible. WSO2 API Manager allows customization and extensibility, in addition to supporting full API lifecycle management. It’s designed to fit into microservices architectures. “Also, WSO2 provides great support,” says Donghwa.

Based on JHipster, a Yeoman generator for Sprint Boot applications, SmartApp uses best-in-breed components like Spring Boot, Spring Cloud Components, MongoDB, MySQL, HTML5, Angular JS, React, Bootstrap, and OAuth to generate responsive and cloud-ready Java applications. This saves developers hundreds of hours in manual coding. Compared to traditional application development which can take several sprints and up to fifteen weeks to complete, SmartApp compresses project set up/plumbing, basic CRUD Domain implementation and custom development into 2-3 weeks.

The beauty of SmartApp is its simplicity. The user selects an application’s desired features from a list of menu items which then generates a secure, unit-tested, and standardized project structure specific to the user’s specifications. A fully functional application can be built in minutes, with no coding required. Features include auto-populated project libraries, architectures and database back-ends. SmartApp is also available as a Vagrant-ready Docker image.

The infrastructure supporting SmartApp is called SPADE (Self-Provisioning And Dashboard Environment). SPADE is an open-source DevSecOps platform-as-a-service (PaaS) that deploys and manages SmartApp microservices. It supports modern containerized deployments while complying with the government’s three-zone architecture. This infrastructure is web-based, cloud-hosted, API-driven, vendor-agnostic, open-source, hosted on-premise, and has dashboard functionality. SPADE also enables SmartAPP users to develop, test, deploy, and maintain microservices.

Better, Faster Healthcare Apps

Both SmartApp and SPADE make up the complete solution by which CMS can develop, deploy, and manage federally compliant, secure healthcare applications in a matter of minutes. CMS is now able to automate the long-drawn out process of application development, and by reducing the time spent on time-consuming tasks, they can focus more on delivering value to their customers.

Learn more about SmartApp and SPADE in this video:

Find out more about WSO2 API Manager. We were named as a Leader in The Forrester Wave™: API Management Solutions, Q4 2018 Report.

Using Open Source Technology to Solve Complex Integration Needs at American Express Global Business Travel

American Express Global Business Travel (GBT) is a travel and meetings management company, which operates in 140 countries at present. They receive over 3 million messages and make 100 million service calls, all in one day! To effectively deal with the sheer volume of messages and calls, GBT launched Global Trip Record™, a platform that captures all global bookings on various transport companies in one system and functions as their single source of real-time and historic trip data.

A Strong Orchestration Layer: The Need of the Hour

GBT was looking for a strong orchestration layer on which to build this platform. They had an existing legacy system, part of which was a Java application that had thousands of lines of code across different files. For this reason, each redeployment required IT to shut-down, then re-start, the entire system. “No integration is easy and proprietary software doesn’t allow you to change much,” says Pradeep Chintam, software engineer at GBT. “As a developer, I like working with the code everyday. We were also looking for a product that allowed customization together with reliability. Hence, the decision to use WSO2 Enterprise Integrator,” he explains.

Eventually GBT decided on a microservices approach, yet they evaluated the pros and cons carefully first. Pradeep had a lot of questions on how microservices can be used to orchestrate between services, how to proceed with service discovery, and how to perform load balancing and fault tolerance. “When discussing microservices architecture, a lot of people are of the view that you should have smart endpoint and dumb pipes. I honestly don’t agree with that. What do we want from a solution – to follow principles to the letter or an application that functions without glitches? I think many people would choose the latter, no matter how important principles are,” says Pradeep. That was exactly what was done with WSO2 Enterprise Integrator when building their new platform.

GBT has many connecting systems and wanted to enforce a single entry point to their application. Thus, the architecture is built in way that everything connects via WSO2 Enterprise Integrator, and all orchestration between microservices happen within WSO2 Enterprise Integrator itself. This architecture has worked for 2 years to date, without a single instance of downtime.

Pradeep speaking at WSO2Con

The Deployment Model

Every message passes through at least thirty microservices and all the message transformation is handled by WSO2 Enterprise Integrator. GBT scales up their microservices so that they can handle hundreds of transactions and messages per second, but they scale the Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) based on their needs. To accomplish this, GBT also also uses Apache Kafka to bring elasticity to the application, as they do not want to overload WSO2 Enterprise Integrator when connecting 30 different downstream vendors.

During the deployment model, the code is first checked into git. The architecture includes a Jenkins server where the build is triggered and it then passes to SonarQube which verifies all vulnerabilities and bugs. It is then packaged to CAR files. A plain ESB image is pulled, customized files are overwritten, and the CAR files are then copied to appropriate folders. After that, the final Docker image is created and published in their Nexus repository. Deployment is triggered in OpenShift which only receives the image tag number. OpenShift will then pull the image from Nexus, deploy it, and is finally ready to serve the request.

Unlike the industry standard, GBT does not use a governance registry in their architecture. As a result, Pradeep limited the number of instances and technologies. GBT uses a custom solution, where they use another ESB project which acts as their governance registry.

This solution is an integral component of GBT’s aim to provide travel management tools that offer millions of customers around the world the best possible travel experience. “The fact that WSO2 Enterprise Integrator is open source and allows for flexibility were big plus points for us. Apart from that, the support has been great. I’ve been using the product for over 6 years and I’ve only raised a support ticket once, which was solved within the day,” says Pradeep.

To learn more about how GBT created Global Trip Record™, watch this video: