Category Archives: Customers

NewWave Taps API-driven Innovations to Develop Federally Compliant Healthcare Microservices for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is a federal agency in the United States Department of Health and Human Services that administers the Medicare program and works with state governments to administer Medicaid. It is the single largest payer for healthcare in the United States and provides services to over 130 million Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries. Creating a stream of relevant and timely applications and products to service their significant customer base, while ensuring compliance with federal IT regulations, poses enormous challenges to CMS.

Traditionally, it takes several hundreds of hours of manual coding to develop an application that meets the federal government’s 3-zone architecture requirement. The process is so laborious and time consuming that the solution being developed often risks being obsolete before it has even deployed. Fortunately, CMS’ healthcare technology partner, NewWave, has devised an API-based solution that develops and deploys federally compliant healthcare microservices at hyper speed.

NewWave’s mission is to work with their clients to modernize their businesses and empower them to use technology in new ways. Donghwa Kim, director of application engineering at NewWave, says, “When we solve problems, we constantly remind ourselves of three things – people, processes, and tools. And of all three, people always comes first.” In keeping with this mission, the challenge of technological obsolescence at CMS was a natural fit for the company.

Donghwa discussing this solution at WSO2Con USA

Powered by Flexible APIs

Using API-driven innovations, NewWave developed SmartApp, a powerful development accelerator that streamlines application start-up and delivery at CMS. NewWave compared several vendors and settled on the open source WSO2 API Manager, as it had all the features they required for the new solution, which above-all needed to be flexible. WSO2 API Manager allows customization and extensibility, in addition to supporting full API lifecycle management. It’s designed to fit into microservices architectures. “Also, WSO2 provides great support,” says Donghwa.

Based on JHipster, a Yeoman generator for Sprint Boot applications, SmartApp uses best-in-breed components like Spring Boot, Spring Cloud Components, MongoDB, MySQL, HTML5, Angular JS, React, Bootstrap, and OAuth to generate responsive and cloud-ready Java applications. This saves developers hundreds of hours in manual coding. Compared to traditional application development which can take several sprints and up to fifteen weeks to complete, SmartApp compresses project set up/plumbing, basic CRUD Domain implementation and custom development into 2-3 weeks.

The beauty of SmartApp is its simplicity. The user selects an application’s desired features from a list of menu items which then generates a secure, unit-tested, and standardized project structure specific to the user’s specifications. A fully functional application can be built in minutes, with no coding required. Features include auto-populated project libraries, architectures and database back-ends. SmartApp is also available as a Vagrant-ready Docker image.

The infrastructure supporting SmartApp is called SPADE (Self-Provisioning And Dashboard Environment). SPADE is an open-source DevSecOps platform-as-a-service (PaaS) that deploys and manages SmartApp microservices. It supports modern containerized deployments while complying with the government’s three-zone architecture. This infrastructure is web-based, cloud-hosted, API-driven, vendor-agnostic, open-source, hosted on-premise, and has dashboard functionality. SPADE also enables SmartAPP users to develop, test, deploy, and maintain microservices.

Better, Faster Healthcare Apps

Both SmartApp and SPADE make up the complete solution by which CMS can develop, deploy, and manage federally compliant, secure healthcare applications in a matter of minutes. CMS is now able to automate the long-drawn out process of application development, and by reducing the time spent on time-consuming tasks, they can focus more on delivering value to their customers.

Learn more about SmartApp and SPADE in this video:

Find out more about WSO2 API Manager. We were named as a Leader in The Forrester Wave™: API Management Solutions, Q4 2018 Report.

Using Open Source Technology to Solve Complex Integration Needs at American Express Global Business Travel

American Express Global Business Travel (GBT) is a travel and meetings management company, which operates in 140 countries at present. They receive over 3 million messages and make 100 million service calls, all in one day! To effectively deal with the sheer volume of messages and calls, GBT launched Global Trip Record™, a platform that captures all global bookings on various transport companies in one system and functions as their single source of real-time and historic trip data.

A Strong Orchestration Layer: The Need of the Hour

GBT was looking for a strong orchestration layer on which to build this platform. They had an existing legacy system, part of which was a Java application that had thousands of lines of code across different files. For this reason, each redeployment required IT to shut-down, then re-start, the entire system. “No integration is easy and proprietary software doesn’t allow you to change much,” says Pradeep Chintam, software engineer at GBT. “As a developer, I like working with the code everyday. We were also looking for a product that allowed customization together with reliability. Hence, the decision to use WSO2 Enterprise Integrator,” he explains.

Eventually GBT decided on a microservices approach, yet they evaluated the pros and cons carefully first. Pradeep had a lot of questions on how microservices can be used to orchestrate between services, how to proceed with service discovery, and how to perform load balancing and fault tolerance. “When discussing microservices architecture, a lot of people are of the view that you should have smart endpoint and dumb pipes. I honestly don’t agree with that. What do we want from a solution – to follow principles to the letter or an application that functions without glitches? I think many people would choose the latter, no matter how important principles are,” says Pradeep. That was exactly what was done with WSO2 Enterprise Integrator when building their new platform.

GBT has many connecting systems and wanted to enforce a single entry point to their application. Thus, the architecture is built in way that everything connects via WSO2 Enterprise Integrator, and all orchestration between microservices happen within WSO2 Enterprise Integrator itself. This architecture has worked for 2 years to date, without a single instance of downtime.

Pradeep speaking at WSO2Con

The Deployment Model

Every message passes through at least thirty microservices and all the message transformation is handled by WSO2 Enterprise Integrator. GBT scales up their microservices so that they can handle hundreds of transactions and messages per second, but they scale the Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) based on their needs. To accomplish this, GBT also also uses Apache Kafka to bring elasticity to the application, as they do not want to overload WSO2 Enterprise Integrator when connecting 30 different downstream vendors.

During the deployment model, the code is first checked into git. The architecture includes a Jenkins server where the build is triggered and it then passes to SonarQube which verifies all vulnerabilities and bugs. It is then packaged to CAR files. A plain ESB image is pulled, customized files are overwritten, and the CAR files are then copied to appropriate folders. After that, the final Docker image is created and published in their Nexus repository. Deployment is triggered in OpenShift which only receives the image tag number. OpenShift will then pull the image from Nexus, deploy it, and is finally ready to serve the request.

Unlike the industry standard, GBT does not use a governance registry in their architecture. As a result, Pradeep limited the number of instances and technologies. GBT uses a custom solution, where they use another ESB project which acts as their governance registry.

This solution is an integral component of GBT’s aim to provide travel management tools that offer millions of customers around the world the best possible travel experience. “The fact that WSO2 Enterprise Integrator is open source and allows for flexibility were big plus points for us. Apart from that, the support has been great. I’ve been using the product for over 6 years and I’ve only raised a support ticket once, which was solved within the day,” says Pradeep.

To learn more about how GBT created Global Trip Record™, watch this video:

Micron Technology: Leveraging an API-first Strategy to “Chip” Away at Technical Debt

What do a caveman, a horse cart, and a Micron developer have in common? They all use archaic tools.

Micron Technology — a global manufacturer of semiconductor devices, headquartered in Boise, USA — currently has numerous monolithic client/server applications and legacy technology that amount to a lot of technical debt. To solve this issue, they decided to migrate from a system deeply entrenched with internally developed thick clients to an API-first strategy using WSO2 API Manager.

The Problem at Hand

Micron Technology has many dynamic link libraries (DLLs) that are deployed throughout 40,000 workstations across the company. Thick client applications are pushed to each desktop and all DLLs, .NET libraries and the issues that come with them need to be managed. By employing an API management layer, they first aimed to simplify the means for migrating and managing this system.

Today, if they wanted to do an enhancement to a DLL, they don’t know who it will impact and can’t easily find out who the owners are. So another key requirement was to have the ability to identify owners and users of those APIs. They also needed throttling capabilities and 24/7/365 uptime was critical. Next, they needed to support all sites with one solution. This includes the front-end site where the semiconductor chips and created and the back-end site where the processed chip is tested, probed and packaged.

They also needed to ensure that standards and best practices for API development and deployment were followed, which proved to be a difficult task considering the paradigm shift for Micron developers. “We need to provide a solution that makes it easy to design, develop, and manage these new web services,” says Alan Pearson, IT Operations Manager at Micron Technology.

The Journey to API Freedom

To create this solution they needed key functionality including security, monitoring, throttling, multi-tenancy, transforming, and routing capabilities – which lead them to WSO2.

They are currently deploying WSO2 API Manager on-premise and are in the process of reworking all their thick application to an API-first approach while providing the guaranteed uptime. They have 10 gateway deployments worldwide, kept up-to-date using subversion sync, with the master publisher and store in Boise, Idaho. Updates to WSO2 API Manager are applied every month using WSO2 Update Manager and Puppet scripts, which has saved them 15 hours of manual work and eliminated the possibility of human error.

They have now enabled core APIs as web services for language agnostic development, which eliminates the need to recreate the wheel for every desktop update (for example from Visual Studio 2010 to Visual Studio 2017). This is done by moving the data access and business logic to the web service.

They also implemented a global server load balancer, which is a self-aware system that sets up an alias and routes users (the developers) to the nearest site based on their location. For example, if a user makes a request from Taiwan, the load balancer would point them to the Singapore gateway. If for some reason that gateway is down, there will be an automatic failover to the Boise gateway. This provides resiliency and guaranteed uptime. In addition to this, they also created a number of usage metrics.

Creating an API Marketplace

Micron Technology didn’t stop there. To really make this API-first approach a success, they needed to educate their developers and make sure usage increased. This was done by applying the concepts of an API marketplace and promoting activities like evangelism, hackathons, and workshops. They built a Center of Excellence (CoE) that was responsible for helping the development community understand what the API gateway was and how to leverage it.

They did dog and pony shows in sites around the world, created manuals, conducted train-the-trainer sessions, and even employed additional training through Yenlo — a WSO2 Premier Certified Integration Partner. An innovation initiative was also introduced. They used an API that translates English to whatever language (the secure tech translator) to provide an overview of the API store and publisher. They then conducted a hackathon that allowed users to create and publish their own web services.

“The cool thing is you could translate English to Klingon [a fictional language in Star Trek], and when I did this is the demo, a few people actually understood what I translated,” says Alan. This shows how relating an educational session to something that their developers were interested in really helped Micron Technology with their onboarding process.

Learning Areas for a Successful API Program

Because it was a major paradigm shift for their developers, providing them with the appropriate training and tools was key. They also had to align WSO2 ownership within the team (from the hardware to the applications) in order to speed up turnover time and tighten the integration. Implementing the global server load balancer was also an important step in ensuring high availability. Additionally, they used Puppet to automate where possible and reduce manual work.

“The other thing I had to do is really go around and sell, sell, sell. If it means doing site visits, visiting with all our developers, and doing on-site training, that’s what we’ll do to get a successful deployment,” says Alan.

They still have a lot left to do including growing their documentation, continuing their training, supporting DevOps and API lifecycle management, creating a WUM test area and evaluating WSO2’s cloud deployment for external facing APIs.

After an architecture review and use case walkthroughs, WSO2 identified and added product enhancements to the roadmap including access control for an unlimited tier and mediation extensions. “WSO2 does listen and partnering with them has helped out. We’ve had quick turnaround on [support] tickets, they’ve added numerous enhancement requests, and we’ve had on-site architectural reviews that have been really helpful to drive the product forward,” concludes Alan.

Watch Alan’s presentation at WSO2Con USA to learn more.

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Did you know? We were named a leader in The Forrester Wave: API Management Solutions, Q4 2018 report. You can download the report here, no email required.

Skate to Where the Puck Will Be: How Wells Fargo Created an Award Winning, Customer Facing API Channel

When studying Internet user habits, Wells Fargo came across a surprising revelation – although the amount of time that individuals spend online has leaped significantly over a 16 year time frame (from 2000 to 2016), only around 3% of that time is allocated to browsing about financial services. This got Eric Halverson, SVP, Head of Gateway Support & Services at Wells Fargo, thinking about their existing distribution channel and how it can be improved to provide better experiences for people. For Eric (and Wells Fargo), doing what’s right for customers means not only answering customer expectations, but exceeding them and building relationships that last a lifetime. Enter the Wells Fargo API Gateway, created using our open source WSO2 API Manager. This platform delivers all their products and services to customers’ digital experience of choice and supports all of Wells Fargo’s business units across the company.

Eric Halvorson presenting a keynote at WSO2Con USA 2018

Yet how do you begin to provide APIs to customers all around the world? Upon realizing there were no large banks in the US that had an API platform, a team of 4 from Wells Fargo spoke to banks in Europe and Southeast Asia, in addition to companies in the US who had built API platforms. Following which Wells Fargo decided to expand this particular team from 4 to 150 within six months. They also decided to use agile, and in essence live the agile manifesto, over the waterfall fashion. The API Gateway was launched on September 2016, with 5 APIs and DevPortal 1.0 (the latter was very basic at the time, although it had all the functionalities for integration).

Fast forward to July 2018, Wells Fargo had hundreds of implementations with many customers who are performing multiple API implementations. The platform provides streamlined on-boarding for both new and existing partners, round the clock operations and support, and multiple security layers in addition to the existing risk management controls. They’ve also launched DevPortal 2.0 which bagged a Monarch Award for its creativity and innovation.

Engaging with their community of customers and partner groups takes precedence for Wells Fargo. They’ve repeatedly heard from customers about the difficulties they face when implementing large scale platforms. Which is why from the project’s inception, Wells Fargo went that extra mile to ensure that customers can integrate easily. The fastest onboarding time so far? One day!

Customers and partnerships will continue to be at the forefront as Wells Fargo continues to explore the many API opportunities that are out there. Currently they’ve identified 3 areas of interest: creating API products for wholesale customers, partnerships with 3rd party platforms, and accelerate Wells Fargo integrations with vendor solutions. Eric explains further, “As we gain more experience with our customers and see how our integrations work, we’ll open up to more as we go along. It’s a constantly evolving strategy of trying to be where the puck will be – we want to be where the industry is moving before it gets there.”

Some use cases of the Wells Fargo API Gateway include account aggregation, ACH payments, and foreign exchange. Retail customers are a big beneficiary of account aggregation APIs, as they can control access to their data through a product named Control Tower™ which Wells Fargo introduced specifically for this purpose. Customers can check their account balance and activity data on approved aggregator sites. As the top ACH payment provider in the US, Wells Fargo has built up their transactional APIs to be re-used, allowing customers to move from one experience to another with minimal changes to their resources underlying the APIs. Customers who need to transfer funds internationally benefit from the foreign exchange platform, which is directly connected to customers’ ERP or customer portals. These customers can obtain a foreign exchange quote, book a deal, and settle the payments all in one go. “We’re making people’s lives richer by embedding financial services in the moment they’re at, and delivering services to where the customer is at rather than making them come to us,” concludes Eric.

Watch Eric’s presentation for more details about the Wells Fargo API Gateway.

Learn more about WSO2 API Manager. Did you know? We were named as a Leader in The Forrester Wave™: API Management Solutions, Q4 2018 Report. You can download this report here, no details required.

MConnect: Digitally Transforming Government and Improving Services for Citizens

E-Government platforms are growing in popularity globally and with good reason – when implemented, these platforms help improve transparency, allow data exchange, support data-driven decisions, and lead to cost reduction. In Moldova, the government’s digital transformation agenda and strategy to modernize public services are overseen by the e-Government Center Moldova. This public institution has introduced MConnect – a cloud based interoperability platform powered by WSO2’s Integration capabilities.

“MConnect is the technical solution for the whole framework we do around data exchange in government,” says Artur Reaboi, enterprise architect at E-Government Center Moldova. Artur believes that there are two benefits to data exchange in government – it lowers the number of requests for documents from various government organizations and enables real-time access to data, thereby improving the efficiency of services. From the time that E-Government Center Moldova was initially set up in 2010, Moldova’s government had data-rich registries and the institution’s aim is to use MConnect to link these registries. This process is done via a centralized hub where E-Government Center Moldova is the sole organization responsible for this process, thereby ensuring operations run as smoothly as possible.

E-Government Center Moldova built a National Service Bus, based on WSO2 Enterprise Integrator, which they implemented together with WSO2 Certified Partner iello. Simplicity is a core characteristic of this platform. For example , data providers are encouraged to create generic services, where the National Service Bus is provided with increased data, which is then divided depending on the legal access of data consumers. MConnect consists of the following: interfaces for data consumption and data sources (mediation occurs between these interfaces), the MLog platform based on elasticsearch and has its special connector, and the planned Semantic Catalog (a registry of public data available at various data sources).

MConnect has demonstrated clear benefits since its implementation. Around 30 public authorities (from central ministries) are a part of this platform, and it’s now been expanded to include local public authorities. Artur estimates that E-Government Center Moldova processed approximately 25 million messages in 2017 – which is astounding for a country of 3 million. Furthermore, over 65 web services are in production and it only has an added latency of 100 milliseconds.

“Interoperability is a journey,” says Artur and his single most important piece of advice is that implementation is faster when centralized. Moreover, he encourages implementing generic services, considering the fact that it’s more cost-effective, and building a team of committed integration specialists (willing to stay for the long haul) for a project of this nature. More interesting plans are in the offing for E-Government Center Moldova, which include promoting Interoperability Law, implementing the previously mentioned Semantic Catalog, and modernizing public services to improve service quality for citizens.

Artur’s presentation has more details on the MConnect platform:

Learn more about the capabilities of WSO2 Enterprise Integrator and how it can be implemented in your digital transformation initiatives.

Why Swiss Chocolate Relies on WSO2

The Swiss Federal Office of Information Technology, Systems and Telecommunication (FOITT) is one of the internal ICT service providers in the Federal Administration. It supports the administration by developing and providing efficient, secure, and user and public-friendly IT solutions. As part of its responsibilities, FOITT manages more than 40,000 enterprise users of two of their key platforms – one an electronic customs declaration process for imports/exports and the other, an automated way to manage revenue from taxes.

While these platforms have proved successful, FOITT embarked on a digital transformation initiative to make these more efficient. What they had hoped to achieve was the ability to scale to provide a more seamless experience to users.

At WSO2Con US 2017 Dr. Gion Sialm, chief architect at FOITT, explored how they leveraged WSO2 technology to achieve their objectives. They worked together with Yenlo, a WSO2 Premier Certified Partner, to implement their solution. To illustrate how the two platforms work, Gion took the example of Swiss chocolate – the process of importing cocoa to make chocolate and the distribution of the end product within and outside Switzerland.

The e-Dec (Electronic Declaration) Platform

All goods, and in this instance the import of cocoa and export of chocolate, need to be declared and there’s a specific process that needs to be followed. Given that it’s a fairly complex process involving many functions and stakeholders, FOITT created the e-Dec platform to simplify this process. What it essentially did was digitize this process and made it more efficient and user-friendly. As with any digital platform, the e-Dec platform too needed to be refreshed and revamped to be more aligned with new requirements.

For instance, the platform had a lot of different protocols and some were extremely outdated like POP3S and FTPS. Apart from this challenge, the application was based on the Oracle WebLogic Server, which follows the eXtended Architecture (XA) pattern. “Previously, WSO2 products didn’t support XA, but because of FOITT’s requirement, it’s now a part of their feature list,” noted Gion.

The Fiscal-IT Platform

On the retail side, all goods, like chocolate, sold within Switzerland carries a value-added tax (VAT). Previously, these transactions were done manually so FOITT built the Fiscal-IT platform that automated this process. Again, like the e-Dec platform, this too required improvements to further streamline this process.

For instance, the platform was created in a modular manner so as to have the best of breed technology for each feature resulting in a mix of multiple different technologies, like FileNet, Java and SAP, which all needed to be integrated. “Because we decided to employ microservices, we ended up with a lot of REST and SOAP APIs as well as JMS so we needed an enterprise service bus that was flexible enough to maintain these things easily,” said Gion.

The WSO2 Solution

They followed the same architecture for both platforms so as to reduce cost and speed up their go-to-market. The API Gateway, Publisher and Store components of the WSO2 API Manager as well as the WSO2 Identity Server as the Key Manager were used as their core API management solution. WSO2 integration technology was used for routing and message transformation between the sender’s and receiver’s different protocols. WSO2 analytics (not pictured in the architecture diagram above) also plays an important role in the solution — FOITT, together with their service providers, developed a dashboard using WSO2 Data Analytics Server to identify any problems that occur in the application. The user just has to type in the source and destination program and within a few seconds the metadata of all the messages is collected (message tracing) so that errors can be easily identified. The dashboard can even correlate the messages with the log files, which is a very important feature in a distributed landscape like this.

“WSO2 products relate to digital transformation like the Swiss army knife relates to MacGyver. Our platforms are evolving rapidly. In order to keep pace with this innovation it’s important to have a strong relationship and collaborate well with WSO2,” says Gion. “Automation is also key. We have to manage 11 stages throughout our platforms and doing it manually would be quite impossible,” he adds.

To learn more about how FOITT is leveraging WSO2 technology for key government initiatives, watch Gion’s presentation at WSO2Con US 2017:

ING Model Bank: Customer-Centric Integration to Remain Competitive

How does banking middleware evolve with the times to offer new services to customers and stay competitive globally? ING Model Bank underwent this transformation by using WSO2’s integration platform to perform key functions, as it sought to ensure information integrity and security, high performance, and superior customer experiences.

Traditionally, banks have big hosts given the complexity of systems and the number of processes that need to be supported. Yet to adapt to customers’ evolving needs (and new services), such systems have to change. Transforming banking middleware stacks begin with identifying three main problems and altering approaches used to tackle them:

  • Oversimplification – avoid oversimplification. Be ready to manage an “in motion” architecture and learn to design for changes (lowering costs in the process as well).
  • Big migration – apart from consuming resources, big migrations freeze an organization’s capacity to respond to customer needs. Learn to design for micro-changes instead.
  • Separating customer needs from technology – customer needs evolve, and technology must support this and processes must be linked accordingly.

A common solution to the above is to use the Bus pattern, which is a mix of the Canonical Data Model and Common Command Set, with a common communication mechanism. Implementing a Bus pattern can be done using either a broker or broker-less approach. While both these approaches have their advantages, they also have several drawbacks such as adding delays and complexity to the deployment. In such a context, Miguel Garcia, an enterprise architect at ING Model Bank, advocates using a hybrid model: “It’s by far the simpler approach.” The hybrid model has the best of both broker and broker-less approaches, and can be deployed in common scenarios faced worldwide. ING uses WSO2 integration technology (WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus and WSO2 Message Broker), by creating one common BUS created on REST and EVENT APIs managing interactions between all applications (or components).

“We use WSO2 as a broker because we really like the simplicity,” says Miguel. By using WSO2 ESB, ING is able to deploy APIs automatically from their development lifecycle using Swagger definitions with zero down-time. Integration is also accelerated by the ESB’s ability to provide API prototyping using scripting. Having successfully transformed using WSO2’s integration capabilities, Miguel also shares some best practices for undertaking similar projects:

  • In-depth knowledge of the product (such as how it manages interactions in complex scenarios) is essential for deriving the best possible benefits from the product.
  • Use the latest version of the product.
  • Use a clear templating system for traceability, monitoring and logging.
  • Clear definition of the common message and its properties to manage messages.

To find out more about these best practices, watch Miguel’s presentation:

Explore WSO2’s integration platform and how your enterprise can derive benefits from it.

Travis Perkins: Disrupting the Retail Industry with WSO2 Integration Technology

Travis Perkins, UK’s largest supplier of building materials, embarked on their digital transformation journey last year in the hopes of enhancing customer experiences, growing their business and improving the usability of their systems. At WSO2Con EU 2017, Christopher Stone, the head of integration at Travis Perkins, talked about the steps they took to go digital with the help of WSO2 technology and key partners.

To help understand Travis Perkins’ current situation, Christopher used an analogy coined by their previous CIO Neil Pearce – the house of IT.

By looking at all the areas of the house that need improvement, Travis Perkins realized that they needed to adopt integration technologies that would allow their systems to be flexible, future-proof, innovative, and reactive. “Integration is the plumbing, electrical wiring, and foundation — basically the rooms of the house,” said Christopher. “Effective integration and quality data are the key enablers for our digital agenda that is built on a solid foundation such as reliable cloud infrastructure and networking.”

Once Christopher explained this analogy, he explored how they previously worked on integration projects. He would most likely be a part of a program delivery team who is pressured to deliver fast and within a strict budget. This hinders their vision of the overall enterprise benefits and results in a point-to-point spaghetti architecture that leads to high maintenance costs, difficult to support, inconsistent standards, reliability issues, and limited reusability.

Today, Travis Perkins has a central integration layer powered by WSO2 integration and API management products. Services are developed according to project requirements, but built with the entire enterprise in mind using a set of policies, patterns, and standards governed by the project diagnostic team. This results in maximum reusability, easier support and maintenance, and continuous improvement in delivery, quality, and speed. The replacement of their core ERP system from a legacy system to an ERP vendor named M3, for sales order entry, sales order management, pricing, tool hire, finance, and supply chain is the largest program Christopher’s team is currently delivering on. But they have been involved in various other integration projects too. “The right tools combined with the correct mindset, architecture, and governance allows you to meet your goals in achieving good enterprise integration which benefits your company as a whole,” he says.

Many external parties helped Travis Perkins along their journey. In their early days, Wheeve, integration technology experts partnered with WSO2, gave them a theoretical and conceptual mindset on how an integration department should run. They helped set up the department and build up the team and aided them with their architecture and processes. During the delivery phase, Travis Perkins’ engineers and analysts were supplemented by ICT solutions providers partnered with WSO2 — Chakray and Mitra Innovation. They offered integration specialists well-versed in the WSO2 platform who helped analyze the requirements and worked in an Agile Scrum fashion to deliver the projects. “They have helped us come leaps and bounds, not only in delivering projects but also in terms of learning from their experience and knowledge of the WSO2 platform,” said Christopher.

“WSO2 is a great platform. It enables us to deliver quickly and compliments our strategy to utilize open source technology wherever possible,” Christopher concluded. “When any of our engineers come across difficulties in development, the WSO2 Subscription gives us great SLA’s. We don’t need to use production maintenance support very often, but when it does happen we have a very good relationship with WSO2 for them to support us in getting back to business as usual.”

To learn more about how Travis Perkins is successfully traversing its digital transformation path, watch Christopher’s video at WSO2Con EU 2017 below.

Bringing an Efficient Home Care Solution to Life with WSO2 Technology

Senior citizens and disabled people—many in fragile health and requiring assistance—often have limited resources for managing their health and ensuring their security. Effective home care solutions allow such people to safely go about their day-to-day lives and enhances their quality of life. To aide home caregivers and patients, Raffaello Leschiera, a solution architect at Engineering Ingegneria Informatica, proposed a reference architecture for efficient home care using WSO2 technology at WSO2Con EU 2017.

Raffaello began by exploring the proposed reference architecture that connected and interfaced with all stakeholders, like the patient, his/her family and medical staff. Firstly, they need to collect data from medical devices in the patient’s home. Protocols like IEEE VU specifications are used and medical devices are mediated using Arduino and Raspberry Pi boards. Once collected, the data needs to be normalized and stored so it’s represented in the same way no matter which device it was collected from.

This data needs to run through analytics to monitor the patient’s health, process events and if needed, send notifications through various communication channels. Data integration channels using the HL7 standard protocol for health care is used to send this data to medical staff. The medical staff can then access it through web and mobile interfaces and an API gateway decouples all features from these user interfaces. And finally, the entire system needs to be synchronized and controlled by identity and access management to ensure security and privacy.

Reference architecture for a home care solution

Raffaello noted that WSO2’s comprehensive technology platform, particularly its integration and analytics capabilities, were the main reasons for picking WSO2 as their technology partner. The open source nature of the products was also a key deciding factor since Raffaello and his team work with many public administrators who prefer to adopt solutions that are completely open source. “WSO2 has a wide technology platform so you can find the right answer to every part of your problem,” said Rafaello. “And because all the products seamlessly integrate with each other it’s easy to focus on the domain problem rather than the technology problem,” he added.

To describe how WSO2 products were used for different tasks, Raffaello compared the home care solution to a football game:

  • Goalkeeper: WSO2 Microservices Framework for Java (WSO2 MSF4J) serves as the goalkeeper. This is the entire back-end of the system, which is based on lightweight microservices that are developed, deployed and monitored through MSF4J in a highly scalable and reliable manner with integrated security.
  • Defenders: WSO2 Data Analytics Server serves as one defender that receives data, analyzes it in real-time, and sends notifications. WSO2 Enterprise Integrator is the next defender who transforms disparate types of data into a normalized format and sends it to the hospital IT systems.
  • Forwards: WSO2 API Manager is one of the forwards, which faces the medical staff and is used to design, prototype and publish APIs and govern API usage. WSO2 IoT Server is another forward, which faces the medical devices for data collection, device management and protocol support.
  • Wings of the pitch: Here the WSO2 Identity Server takes care of all the strict security and privacy requirements.
  • Center of the pitch: Finally, WSO2 Governance Registry serves as the ‘Lionel Messi’ at the center of the pitch; in other words it governs the solution through surveillance just like how Messi would guide and lead his team to victory.
  • For this solution to work, Engineering Ingegneria Informatica needed a remote device that can track a patient’s movements within his/her home. Enter Joe Care (or the Joker pictured above). Joe Care is a remote presence device that is flexible and agile enough to move around the patient’s home. They used various technologies like Arduino boards, software that deals with movement and the sense of space as well handling (touch). It served as the medical eyes, ears, voice and fingers within the patient’s home.

    In the future Rafaello and his team aim to engage with users more, further analyze threat paths and include more technology like wearables that monitor movement and exercise. They would also like to create more intelligent early warning score models and move their entire solution to the cloud so more patients and operators can access it.

    Watch Rafaello’s presentation at WSO2Con EU 2017 below to learn more about their home care solution powered by WSO2.

Creating an Award Winning, User-Friendly Digital Tax Portal Using WSO2’s Integration Platform

The Netherlands has a long history of water management, owing to a significant proportion of its landmass being below sea level. At present, there are 22 regional water management authorities in the country. One such water management authority is Hoogheemraadschap Hollands Noorderkwartier (HHNK) which partially relies on citizens’ taxes to carry out its important work. Recently, HHNK created an online tax portal using WSO2’s integration platform, which reduced costs, improved efficiency and transparency, and facilitated a simpler tax payment process for Dutch citizens.

HHNK is responsible for various activities – building dams and dykes, sewage water purification, road safety (as some of these routes are based along dams and dykes), water storage, and crisis management. They engage with 1.2 million citizens and 30,000 companies who pay taxes, has water control assets amounting to 1,000 miles of embankments, 17,771 miles of canals, and overlooks an area of approximately 500,000 acres of land.

The digitization of the tax payment process has its beginnings in 2013, when the Dutch Government introduced a policy stating that all services offered by government agencies must be carried out electronically. At the same time, HHNK was also looking at ways to improve services to citizens. On assessing their technology architecture, they realized that there was minimal integration and a large number of applications (around 400 in fact at the time). HHNK was looking to implement a service oriented architecture (SOA) with decoupling and reusability of services along with a canonical data model. “People accessed data from an application, which was then taken to another application for uploading. This process resulted in errors at times. When there was integration, it was mostly point to point and we suffered a lot of vendor lock-in. By striving to an SOA and loosely coupled applications, we are now far more flexible than in the past,” elaborates Michel Zwart, Enterprise Architect at HHNK.

HHNK’s WSO2 ESB based architecture

The architecture, developed and implemented together with Yenlo (a WSO2 Premier Certified Partner), is comprised of back office applications providing tax services when users log-in to the portal. Specialized applications are in place for communications, archiving, and other services, such as the residence service for information collection. Business application services were built using WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus.

The new system has delivered wins for residents, employees, and HHNK. The portal is user-friendly, not only making the tax payment process convenient for citizens, but encouraging them to make their payments on time as well. The portal is transparent and provides an online statement of accounts for taxpayers. As for HHNK, they have been able to make some big cost savings. Telephone calls have reduced by 25%, saving them around €40,000 a year due to the presence of the online statement of accounts. They have managed to save about €350,000 a year on hiring costs through the reduction of internal resources, and lower banking costs as a result of direct online transfers. Overall, HHNK has experienced a total cost reduction between €400,000 to €600,000 a year.

There is more good news – HHNK even won an award for providing 100% digitally available services. With these successes, HHNK is looking ahead, and there are plans to introduce WSO2’s API Manager into their architecture. “We will continue to innovate with WSO2,” says Michel.

Watch Michel’s presentation below for a more in-depth discussion of how HHNK digitized their tax payment process.

Find out more about how you can optimize business processes, integrate legacy systems, create digital assets, and more with WSO2’s integration platform.