Tag Archives: Integration

Why We Make Our Product Roadmaps Public

“Can you please share your roadmap?”

“What are your plans to engineer feature xxx?”

“Great product, but does your vision match ours?”

We get these questions all the time, from customers, partners, and analysts.

As the leading open source API integration company, it seemed antithetical to be open and transparent about our code, financials, and priorities, but not about our actual product roadmaps.

So we’ve now opened-up our product and solution visions and roadmaps for each of our integration-related products, all part of our Integration Agile platform:

Why would we do this?

There are a number of reasons we chose to take this bold step – a step that most high-tech companies shun as competitively risky, and thus guard their plans with absurd paranoia.

  • Public roadmaps are consistent with our open source community
  • We trust our community to work with us, and they can only do so if they know our plans. That way they are always involved in the technology and will be able to best deliver meaningful new features, contributions, and roadmap suggestions.

  • Public roadmaps signal our transparency
  • Transparency is key to building trust between partners. A public roadmap helps committers, partners and customers to know we’re pulling no punches with our direction. It’s also consistent with our no-lock-in approach… and that means there’s no lock-in to our roadmap either. With a transparent set of roadmaps, our technology partners know what to expect… and have a proactive vehicle to comment on the direction.

  • Public roadmaps are good for our customers’ trust
  • When our customers buy-in to our integration platform, they’re putting technology direction on the line. They want to know if we’ll be evolving in the direction they want. For them, it’s all about mitigating long-term technology risk. This way, we’re “opening the kimono” and boldly stating direction.

  • Public roadmaps show our pride, confidence, and vision
  • WSO2’s technology has been evolving for over 13 years. Over 350 engineers currently work on technologies like API management, identity management, ESBs, enterprise integration, and related integration architectures. This is one way of showing-off our vision and capabilities.

  • Public roadmaps are good for business
  • In sales situations, customers often ask pointed questions about specific (missing) features. And the usual answer “Yup, we’re working on supporting it” is always received with skepticism. Our public roadmaps put our money where our mouth is… either it’s on the roadmap, or it’s not. Or, we work with our partners to change the roadmap… for everyone else to see.

Next, what’s on our Roadmap roadmap?

This is the first of many more steps we’ll be taking toward increased openness and transparency. But the other critical component is your feedback. So if you have thoughts about our roadmap- positive or negative – there are many avenues you can use, including our Contact Us button – and include your feedback.

Everything I know about Integration I learned at the Ballet

or, New ways to bring together the world of arts and technology…

Why would the inventors of an integration programming language partner with a Ballet company?

We asked ourselves that when WSO2, launched Ballerina, a new programming language for writing code to integrate software.

The notion of integrating software isn’t new… it’s been around for 10-15 years. And the current market for software integration — the set of technologies used to connect different software components together — is billions of dollars. That’s huge because there is simply so much software and data in the world. It resides not only in the companies that build it, but also in the “cloud”and in the billions of devices that people carry and use.

But when we thought about creating a programming language for integrating software, we didn’t realize how it would lead us to the San Francisco Ballet.

Enter Stage Left: Two entirely different — yet similar — partners

I don’t consider the SF Ballet one of those stodgy steeped-in-tradition companies. Just the fact that it’s in San Francisco means it has access to diverse-thinking, art-loving, Silicon Valley open-to-anything audiences…as well as access to global dance talent. To further appeal to this audience, they offer an annual Sensorium program that synthesizes dance, art, and music. They asked, “What could be possible when we integrate all of these art forms into one evening of celebration?”

Meanwhile, leadership at WSO2 asked something similar. What could be possible if we took a radical, new and open approach to connecting and integrating all software technologies? What would be possible if we developed an internal corporate culture of openness and transparency, of appreciation of our personal diversity?

When WSO2 began developing Ballerina roughly three years ago, we chose the name because of its technical elegance. But we hardly knew how prescient that name would be. So in 2018 when we officially launched the language, we thought that involving a ballet company might be a cool creative move, consistent with the “Ballerina” name. But what we discovered with the SF Ballet was much more. We realized that we had many themes and goals in common.

Common themes in the arts *and* in technology

When the SF Ballet told us about Sensorium and their mission to blend arts and technology, we knew we had a great future together. And so, WSO2 became the SF Ballet’s first technology sponsor.

Together, we found three common overarching themes arose that both patrons of the arts — as well as technologists — could appreciate: the concepts of integration, elegance, and openness.

Integration: Literally and metaphorically, this is the key to all creativity. In the arts, SF Ballet knew that dance, music, culture, and even technology could come together to create new experiences and new ways to engage the public. Integration at the Sensorium was a way to co-locate art, music, and dance exhibitions — and allow guests to interact with all of them. In the arts, integration often means a “synthesis” of diverse media and approaches to its use. And so, in technology, integration is a necessary approach to innovation, building on diverse software components that are often created by others. The beauty with technological integration is that the original developer may never know how the software component might be used by others to create something new, exciting or valuable.

Elegance: This is a word that’s often used with the assumption that it relates to the arts, to fashion or to dance. In those contexts, elegance is the use of resources like the body, fabric or media (or a combination) to create something of beauty — something that makes perfect or unique use of those assets. Often we just know elegance when we see it. As a recovering engineer, I also know there is absolutely an elegance to technology, science, and mathematics as well. Think about a suspension bridge, making perfect use of minimal materials — steel or concrete as support and cables to suspend — not a touch more heft or bulk than needed. Similarly, in mathematics, there are often short, concise formulas that so perfectly describe the physical world. And the same goes for coding where elegant programming makes efficient use (and re-use) of software components.

Openness: This last theme is deceptively simple but powerful. It’s about the importance of openness to new experiences, cultures, media, and perspectives. In technology, openness (i.e. open-source software) is also a well-known concept that means allowing others to build and create on top of your work, to view your code, your instructions, your architecture. In personal relationships — as well business and politics — openness implies trust and even a disruption of power (think: free press). So, openness is a necessary platform for true creativity as well as for effective innovation.

Will Ballerina learn more from SF Ballet?

At WSO2 and with Ballerina, as well as with the SF Ballet, we’re looking to continue thinking about more and different ways to “do integration” — whether it’s a revolutionary mashup of arts and culture, or new code-first approaches to integrate software, data and cloud computing. And that’s the beginning of a beautiful relationship: common goals, common interests, common values.

After all, a more integrated world—in arts and technology — is a more interesting, innovative, and creative place to be.

Scaling Single-Sign-On with the Swiss Alpine Club

Mountain climbers and hikers in the Alps need reliable assistance, and that’s exactly what the Swiss Alpine Club (SAC) provides. Established in 1863, SAC is passionate about alpinism. They’ve contributed to the development of the Alpine region over the centuries and are advocates of safe, responsible mountaineering whilst ensuring free access to the mountain world.

Today, SAC has approximately 150,000 members, 111 sections in Switzerland that manage 153 mountain huts. On average, SAC sees 1 million daily visitors to these huts. SAC offers a range of services to both members and non-members. They have a SAC route portal, manage an online store with SAC products, offer discounts for accommodation, organize educational and training opportunities, and much more. Furthermore, SAC relies heavily their 7,000 volunteers who work as officials, guides, and youth organizers. These volunteers are supported by SAC’s IT office, which is located in the Swiss city of Bern.

Integration and Identity Management for User Convenience

SAC defined their digital strategy 2 years ago, and the cornerstone of this strategy is easy usage and access of services for their members and non-members. To this end, they had a straightforward set of goals which include: one identity login across all SAC services, single-sign-on (SSO) to access different services, easy onboarding of members, and to provide self-management of user accounts. SAC has around half a million users (this number keeps growing daily) and there are about 6,000 roles. Given the number of roles and types of membership (for example, officials, wardens, subscribers, etc.) means that there is a quite complex identity management structure at SAC.

SAC worked together with WSO2 Certified Integration Partner Avintis to implement their strategy. Right from the beginning of this project, both SAC and Avintis agreed on the consolidation of SAC’s user store. SAC’s new solution is composed of 2 parts – one part is concerned with integration and the other focuses on authentication, powered by WSO2 Enterprise Integrator (which can be used to build, scale, and secure integration solutions) and WSO2 Identity Server (which is a uniquely flexible product for identity needs) respectively. Being open source, both WSO2 Enterprise Integrator and WSO2 Identity Server provide SAC with a solution to avoid vendor and data lock-in, and use open standards for identity management and integration. This also further enables SAC to keep abreast with ever changing market needs.

The solution has a bi-directional integration with Microsoft Dynamics NAV and WSO2 Enterprise Integrator. They’ve also implemented REST based web services. This solution also consists of one master user store, with multiple service providers. At present, they have 6 service providers but this could potentially increase to 100 depending on the speed at which their implementation progresses. SAC translates their business cases to their user store and assign the right roles in the user store. They’ve created a login app on top of WSO2 Identity Server, which received the customer services that passes through WSO2 Enterprise Integrator. Furthermore, the identity management component follows the OpenID connect protocol.

The Result: One Login App for Everything (Literally)

SAC has reduced their data silos with the new solution. The resulting single login app facilitates user authentication, registration, membership applications, account activation, and password resets. Users can now book accommodation, subscribe to SAC services, shop in the online store, and access any other service with one single identity.

SAC’s plans extend beyond creating a seamless and convenient user experience. They’re now looking at WSO2 API Manager (which can be used to address any spectrum of the API lifecycle, monetization, and policy enforcement) for secure access to and management of upcoming/ existing APIs. In order to achieve scalability and reduce downtimes to zero, SAC runs most of the applications in Docker containers using Jelastic PaaS, and plans to migrate all of their web infrastructure to this cloud platform.

With plenty of changes anticipated in the near future (along with rising numbers of visitors to the Alps), Daniel Fernandez, head of IT at SAC, advises meticulous planning when undertaking a digital transformation project of this nature. And in addition to planning, he advocates being prepared for unexpected situations, as in his opinion a project such as this has an impact on everything else in an enterprise.

Listen to Daniel’s presentation for more details on how SAC implemented SSO.

WSO2 API Manager, WSO2 Enterprise Integrator, and WSO2 Identity Server form the WSO2 Integration Agile Platform. Learn all about our open source approach here.

Schneider Electric Uses API-driven Integration for Innovative Energy Management

Schneider Electric is the market leader in the digital transformation of the energy management and automation industry, with an annual revenue of over 25 billion Euros and around 150,000 employees in more than 100 countries. Schneider Electric makes it possible for IoT-enabled solutions to seamlessly connect, collect, analyze, and act on data in real-time. In doing so, they deliver enhanced safety, efficiency, reliability, and sustainability to their customers. The company helps its customers do three main things: enable them to to manage their efficiency better by optimizing their processes and energy usage; manage their energy supply better by integrating local production and managing energy sourcing; and lastly, manage their grid better through digitalization.

Addressing Changing Energy Needs Through Technology

Schneider Electric is keenly aware of the changing energy and technology landscape and knows that it needs to stay ahead of these changes in order to remain competitive. As the demand for energy continues to increase, Schneider Electric’s approach to solving this issue is to find ways of generating energy more efficiently. Using digitization and IoT, the company is looking at being three times more efficient in its energy demand going forward.
In 2015, Schneider Electric decided to move from solution-driven integration, to a service oriented architecture (SOA). This simplified how customers could access and consume services in a more standardized way, and also shielded them from the complexity of the back-end of the SOA systems. The digital team at Schneider Electric decided to use APIs to support the new SOA, and sought API publishers that would be able to expose APIs easily, and manage them effectively.

Schneider Electric chose WSO2 API Manager because it fulfilled all of their requirements while being open source and flexible in that it could be deployed on-premises or in the cloud. WSO2 API Manager was the ideal choice as it addresses full API lifecycle management, monetization, and policy enforcement as well as extensibility and customization.

They also decided to replace their legacy integration solution with WSO2 Enterprise Integrator in order to further support their API real-time strategy. WSO2 Enterprise Integrator is a comprehensive integration solution that enables communication between various disparate applications. Instead of having Schneider Electric’s various applications communicate directly with each other in all their different formats, WSO2 Enterprise Integrator would enable all of the disparate applications to communicate with the the product which handles transforming and routing of messages to their appropriate destinations. According to Tristan Solanet, integration platform owner at Schneider Electric, using WSO2 Enterprise Integrator has helped bring consistency across the company.

Deployment From Europe to the US and China

Schneider Electric began by deploying WSO2 API Manager and WSO2 Enterprise Integrator in a data center in Europe. The company uses both internal gateways and external gateways, the former for internal network usage and the latter has a subset of APIs published on them. As its customer base in the US expanded, Schneider Electric’s digital team decided to deploy select API gateways in North America using an Amazon virtual private cloud. This addressed the problem of latency that US customers had experienced when they had to call gateways in Europe in order to access information and support. The next step in Schneider Electric’s deployment strategy was to address the increasing demand from China. Taking into consideration the specificities of the Chinese context, Schneider Electric deployed additional gateways in China. Among the challenges the company faced was in making the connection between China and Europe work. The connection between the US and Europe through the company’s internal network had been a lot smoother than the one between China and Europe. Ultimately, it was decided that a second key manager be configured in China, in addition to the original one in Europe.

Schneider Electric’s partnership with WSO2 has enabled the company to share functional intelligence with their customers using log value. Custom dashboards have also been developed to suit the company’s needs using WSO2’s analytics capabilities. Metrics are monitored on a real-time basis on these dashboards and can be filtered for geographic region, period of time, and customer’s perspective.

EcoStruxure: An IoT Enabled Interoperable Platform

Schneider Electric also created EcoStruxure, an IoT-enabled, plug-and-play, open, interoperable architecture and platform. It is used in homes, buildings, data centers, and infrastructure industries and delivers innovation at multiple levels from Connected Products to Edge Control, and Apps, Analytics and Services. EcoStruxure has 6 domains of expertise – Power, IT, Building, Machine, Plant, and Grid and uses standard communication protocols to simplify the collection of data from intelligent devices around a customer’s organization. The data is then analyzed either locally using Edge Control or remotely in the cloud to provide the customer with critical insights to improve their business.

Interoperability is a key feature of EcoStruxure, facilitating the deployment of a range of agnostic applications, analytics, and services for seamless enterprise integration. To put it simply, EcoStruxure bridges IT and IoT and allows customers to maximize the value of their business data. Data is transformed into actionable intelligence which in turns leads to wiser business decisions. To date, deployment of EcoStruxure exceeds 450,000 installations, with the support of 9,000 system integrators, and over a billion connected devices.

mySchneider App: Showcasing Digital Transformation at Schneider Electric

The redesigned mySchneider App is one of the flagships of Schneider Electric’s digital transformation initiative. Distributors, partners, Schneider employees and increasingly, end-users use it to connect to the company’s digital hub. Based almost entirely on APIs, mySchneider App allows access to information on order management, support, partnership management, and a comprehensive product catalog. The app has been translated into 36 languages and has approximately 30,000 unique users a month. Each user has the ability to customize their interface with the app based on their user profile and country.

The benefits of an API-led connectivity approach include building reusable assets that save the company time and money, creating infrastructure that is flexible and designed for change, along with enhanced visibility, compliance, and governance. Projects are now delivered faster and team productivity is greater as a result.

Schneider Electric believes that by implementing SOA with an API-led connectivity approach, facilitated by WSO2, they have been able to drive business agility, provide customers with better customer experiences, and retain their competitive advantage as the world leader in the digital transformation of energy management and automation.

Watch Tristan’s talk to learn more about Schneider Electric’s plans to prepare for the future.

New to the WSO2 Integration Agile platform? Learn more about our technology for API management and enterprise integration, all open source!

The API-driven World: WSO2 Integration Summit is Coming to a City Near You!

Starting in March, the WSO2 team, our partners, and I will be hitting the road for the 2019 WSO2 Integration Summit world tour. The 2018 Summit series was our biggest yet, featuring customer success stories from enterprises that have used our technology to fulfill digital transformation strategies and create innovative experiences for their customers. Refusing to sit back and relax, we’re making the 2019 Summits even better. We will be visiting at least 24 cities in 20 countries and 6 continents to show how you can achieve API-driven integration agility.

We are scaling our efforts by collaborating with our partners on each of our summits. We started this year by inviting all our partners for WSO2 Sales Bootcamp. For the first time ever, we had partners from all around the world participating in the 2019 kickoff alongside our own teams. Insights were gained, strategies were discussed, plans were made, and the summit tour was born. Because of our partners’ global presence, we are able to reach six of the seven continents (the penguins in Antarctica didn’t show much interest in WSO2!).

Group picture from Sales Bootcamp 2019

Summit Theme: The API-driven World

APIs are touching every facet of our society and the underlying trends are going to generate nearly 1 billion APIs in the coming years. All digital transformation depend on APIs and integration technologies underpin their evolution. Each WSO2 Summit will comprise a full day of vision and practical use cases focused on integrating a world of disaggregated APIs, cloud services, and data. We will discuss topics such as transforming integration projects from waterfall to agile, by moving from the centralized model to a decentralized architecture and methodology; combining enterprise integration, API management, and identity solutions; writing microservices that integrate APIs using Ballerina; and using open source technology for greater customization and flexibility. The summits will also feature guest speakers from digital-native organizations who will talk candidly about their API-driven transformations.

We’ll show you how to navigate current trends and use them to deliver innovation and new opportunities. Listen to visionary keynotes by WSO2 senior leadership, meet and network with industry experts and others who are striving to solve similar enterprise problems, and learn how integration agility could help with maximizing revenue and productivity. Join our interactive discussions to empower your team and stay one step ahead of evolving business needs.

While the the underlying themes of each summit remains the same, the agenda differs from location to location. The interactive sessions are tailored to each region, helping you gain relevant information on what matters to you and your enterprise. From open banking to retail and healthcare, our plan is to cover it all.

WSO2 Integration Summit 2019 global locations

If you are a customer or a community user and would like to speak at one of the summits, please let us know, as we have a limited number of spots still available. Get in touch with us at cfp@wso2.com.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Space is limited, so save your spot today.

Follow @wso2 on Twitter to get the latest updates. We are using the #WSO2Summit hashtag.

Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish: Solving Diverse Integration Needs to Help Students and Instructors Better

Macmillan Learning is a leader in the education publishing and EdTech industries, with a target market of over 9,000 colleges and 50,000 high schools in USA and Canada. Their partnerships with many of the world’s best researchers, educators, and administrators, as well as their emphasis on top quality content drive their business. Macmillan Learning teamed up with Ribbonfish, who specializes in offering service solutions to the media and publishing industries, to answer the changing needs of the education industry – helping both students and instructors improve their outcomes.

A Technology Strategy for an Evolving Industry

Macmillan Learning observed how the education industry has been evolving over the years and realized that they need a strategy to answer to the rapid developments that are taking place in this industry. Key among their goals was responding to market needs faster and providing students with interactive digital solutions to support their education.

However, the education industry is a seasonal one and Macmillan Learning wanted to ensure their new solutions caused the least amount of disruption, particularly during peak times. Another important consideration was the internal organizational structure. “You can’t develop a technology strategy in isolation, we need to be mindful of both the structure and culture of an organization. The culture needs to be improved, particularly when partnering with others and the structure needs to be standardized across the various teams,” says Sagar Bujbal, VP technology at Macmillan Learning.

Like any other business, Macmillan Learning integrates with many disparate systems. “Around 60 to 80% of your time is spent on supporting these various systems, rather than concentrating on innovation. When thinking about the right solutions implement, we really need to quantify the strengths and weaknesses of each of these systems,” says Paul King, a solutions architect at Ribbonfish. Both Paul and Sagar stress on the point that seamless integration in such a context requires architectural guardrails and governance. They explain that a well-defined target reference architecture (prior to development) with a long term vision, taking into account changes that will have to be encountered over the years, is a solid starting point. Best practices and utilizing out-of-box platform capabilities are further requirements for seamless integration.

Sagar and Paul presenting at WSO2Con USA

Selecting the Right Technology

Both Sagar and Paul believe that an enterprise integration platform is one of the most strategic technology decisions that a business makes. They were looking to build a target reference architecture that was business driven, rather than focusing on a particular technology and evaluated several technology vendors based on this. Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish considered factors such as platform capabilities, maturity of the product, type of agility provided for developers, quality of production support, costs, and the vendor’s willingness to work closely with a business to solve their particular needs. Both were of the view that WSO2 Enterprise Integrator, with its integration runtimes, message brokering, business process modeling, and analytics capabilities, catered to their requirements.

Achieving Seamless Integration

Given the fact that integration needs at Macmillan Learning were diverse, Sagar and Paul decided on APIs as the de-facto standard for integrating all their systems. They also made sure that there was no direct coupling. Their current architecture includes the Macmillan Learning integration layer composed of WSO2 Enterprise Integrator along with Salesforce. Paul explains that one of their main goals when building the new architecture was to not over complicate things and using WSO2 helped, “One of the big things we really took from it when we selected WSO2 as a platform and service was that there are plenty of solutions within WSO2 itself.”

Paul and Sagar state that documenting the inventory of business processes and interactions contributed a lot to their success, as it helped them to better define their target reference architecture. They also believe that defining their integration techniques, constant communication with their engineering team, and weekly reviews of what they implemented helped them immensely.

More innovation is planned for Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish. The huge scale of transformation at Macmillan Learning means that there is a continuous demand to meet these requirements. Proactive customer service plays a key role in this transformation. Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish gain insights from interactions between customer care agents, students, and instructors to improve this transformation process and customer satisfaction. And as mentioned earlier, they will continue to review what they do for the best possible outcomes.

To learn more about how Macmillan Learning and Ribbonfish are working together, watch this video:

Everything you need to learn about WSO2 Enterprise Integrator is here.

Using Open Source Technology to Solve Complex Integration Needs at American Express Global Business Travel

American Express Global Business Travel (GBT) is a travel and meetings management company, which operates in 140 countries at present. They receive over 3 million messages and make 100 million service calls, all in one day! To effectively deal with the sheer volume of messages and calls, GBT launched Global Trip Record™, a platform that captures all global bookings on various transport companies in one system and functions as their single source of real-time and historic trip data.

A Strong Orchestration Layer: The Need of the Hour

GBT was looking for a strong orchestration layer on which to build this platform. They had an existing legacy system, part of which was a Java application that had thousands of lines of code across different files. For this reason, each redeployment required IT to shut-down, then re-start, the entire system. “No integration is easy and proprietary software doesn’t allow you to change much,” says Pradeep Chintam, software engineer at GBT. “As a developer, I like working with the code everyday. We were also looking for a product that allowed customization together with reliability. Hence, the decision to use WSO2 Enterprise Integrator,” he explains.

Eventually GBT decided on a microservices approach, yet they evaluated the pros and cons carefully first. Pradeep had a lot of questions on how microservices can be used to orchestrate between services, how to proceed with service discovery, and how to perform load balancing and fault tolerance. “When discussing microservices architecture, a lot of people are of the view that you should have smart endpoint and dumb pipes. I honestly don’t agree with that. What do we want from a solution – to follow principles to the letter or an application that functions without glitches? I think many people would choose the latter, no matter how important principles are,” says Pradeep. That was exactly what was done with WSO2 Enterprise Integrator when building their new platform.

GBT has many connecting systems and wanted to enforce a single entry point to their application. Thus, the architecture is built in way that everything connects via WSO2 Enterprise Integrator, and all orchestration between microservices happen within WSO2 Enterprise Integrator itself. This architecture has worked for 2 years to date, without a single instance of downtime.

Pradeep speaking at WSO2Con

The Deployment Model

Every message passes through at least thirty microservices and all the message transformation is handled by WSO2 Enterprise Integrator. GBT scales up their microservices so that they can handle hundreds of transactions and messages per second, but they scale the Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) based on their needs. To accomplish this, GBT also also uses Apache Kafka to bring elasticity to the application, as they do not want to overload WSO2 Enterprise Integrator when connecting 30 different downstream vendors.

During the deployment model, the code is first checked into git. The architecture includes a Jenkins server where the build is triggered and it then passes to SonarQube which verifies all vulnerabilities and bugs. It is then packaged to CAR files. A plain ESB image is pulled, customized files are overwritten, and the CAR files are then copied to appropriate folders. After that, the final Docker image is created and published in their Nexus repository. Deployment is triggered in OpenShift which only receives the image tag number. OpenShift will then pull the image from Nexus, deploy it, and is finally ready to serve the request.

Unlike the industry standard, GBT does not use a governance registry in their architecture. As a result, Pradeep limited the number of instances and technologies. GBT uses a custom solution, where they use another ESB project which acts as their governance registry.

This solution is an integral component of GBT’s aim to provide travel management tools that offer millions of customers around the world the best possible travel experience. “The fact that WSO2 Enterprise Integrator is open source and allows for flexibility were big plus points for us. Apart from that, the support has been great. I’ve been using the product for over 6 years and I’ve only raised a support ticket once, which was solved within the day,” says Pradeep.

To learn more about how GBT created Global Trip Record™, watch this video:

A Sneak Peek at WSO2Con and BallerinaCon 2018

We’re only one month away from our largest WSO2Con ever… as well as the first-ever BallerinaCon.

With nearly a dozen separate announcements that we’ll be making in the integration space, I’m really excited to be part of this. If you’re a developer, integrator or enterprise architect, or are just into the latest trends in APIs, enterprise architecture or microservices, then the conference is where you need to be. Here are some teasers about what is coming up…

Agile integration. Agile isn’t just for pure development projects anymore, integration is becoming agile and that is a major focus for the conference. We’ll be looking at agile integration from multiple angles: of course the tech will be key, but also people and processes are essential to agile. Transforming organizations into integration agile is front-and-center at this year’s WSO2Con.

Architecture and methodology are key. One of the major lessons we’ve learnt is that the architecture and methodology are key to successful integration. We’ve been working to capture those learnings in a reference architecture and reference methodology for agile integration, and we are really keen to see your feedback on them. As well as introducing our reference architecture, we are also going to be launching our maturity assessment methodology, which is designed to help any organization move towards more agile integration.

Desperately seeking serverless. What do you get when you combine integration agile technologies with Kubernetes and make it multi-cloud? You’ll have to come and find out about about our serverless strategy and solutions.

Microservices everywhere. The popularity and growth of microservices is challenging old approaches to integration. We have an amazing vision of how microservices architecture can enhance, accelerate, and re-energize enterprise integration. We will be unveiling this vision, addressing how integration fits into the microservices architecture.

Going global: new channels, offices, and partner programs. Partner outreach is demanding it, growth curves are predicting it, global reach is requiring it: yes, we’ll be announcing new global office locations. We’ll also have our first all-day partner conference where we’ll reveal an even better partner program for our global partner and global reseller community.

Integration simple and agile. At BallerinaCon (the day after WSO2Con) we’ll dive deep into the Ballerina language, the first cloud-native programming language aimed at targeting the integration gap. While companies have moved to agile, most integration is still on a fast waterfall approach. Integration products have been part of that challenge. But general purpose programming languages aren’t integration simple. We think we have an answer. Come and see what you think. And it’s #1 on TechWorld’s 2018 list.

Finally, some business stuff. We’ll be announcing a number of new pricing options, support model enhancements, and even better customer success and consulting offerings.

We can’t wait to see you in San Francisco.

You Do Not Want to Miss WSO2Con North America, July 16–18 in San Francisco

“This year is going to be the biggest, baddest, most monstrous year yet for our conference. Do not miss out!”

Each year, vendors around the world who host their own conferences make identical claims. With promises of special locations, intriguing speakers, and networking with food (and delightfully intoxicating substances), commercial events turn into rigmarole.

Not this year. Not this conference.

WSO2’s North American conference is going to be a doozy. If you are a developer, architect, integration specialist, partner, CIO, CTO, or CDO, we want to see you at this event as we unveil the next phase of our company, our technology, and our growth.

For the first time, we are hosting three events:

  1. WSO2Con: see us unveil our vision for how digital transformation is evolving and how we will help every organization become integration agile.
  2. WSO2Con Partner Day: our partner ranks have ballooned and our partners generate nearly $250M annually as part of the WSO2 ecosystem. We are hosting a business day dedicated to exploring collaborative opportunities to build markets together. We’ll be unveiling new channel programs, how resellers will shape future integration sales, introduce the global channel team that joined this year, and our investment plan that will help you build annuity and profit streams from our field collaboration.
  3. BallerinaCon: Ballerina is a programming language that makes it ridiculously easy to write microservices that integrate APIs. We are lucky and excited to co-host this first-time event with the language designers and the San Francisco Ballet. Ballerina is gaining global adoption and your experience will have you agree with why Google’s Kelsey Hightower called it “the dopest thing” and Redmonk’s James Governor declared Ballerina “the belle of the Kubecon ball. ”

These events are happening at a time where WSO2 has become the largest open source integration vendor. Integration is suddenly the hottest thing in enterprise software, and that is propelling tremendous growth for us. We are reinvesting all of our gains back into the business, and at the conference we’ll be announcing important software, services and solutions designed to make it easier for any organization to become integration agile.

We’ve become increasingly concerned that as architectures continue to disaggregate due to the drive to scale to support customer demand, those architectures have required organizations to support center-of-excellence integration approaches which impose waterfall constraints and limited agility. We will make sure that this doesn’t happen to you, and in my keynote we’ll be unveiling:

  1. Our agility strategy for organizations of any size, through the presentation of a new reference architecture for agility and agility methodology, including the introduction of cell-based architectures and philosophies to make the composable enterprise as agile as a microservice.
  2. How microservices will pervade all of our products giving you new forms of micro deployments, management and runtimes so that enterprise architecture can increasingly be delegated and crowd sourced.
  3. Our serverless strategy, including how a special collaboration between our engineers and the Apache OpenWhisk community is going to give enterprises an agile approach to event-driven architecture without fearing data or platform lock-in from the megaclouds.
  4. Our commitment and commercial strategy unveiling for Ballerina, a cloud native programming language, which can augment your Java,.NET and JavaScript development by making agile development of microservices accessible to any enterprise.
  5. Substantial new business programs, including microservices-based pricing / packaging and Technical Account Management.
  6. Our territory and local influence expansion plans including our plans for new offices in Mexico, Germany, and other MEAP locations.
  7. New partner programs designed so that WSO2 can make substantial investments into our global partners so that they can create annuity and profit streams.

This is going to be an amazing event and an experience that should not be missed. Come join us and learn about why we believe that WSO2 is going to become the world’s largest integration vendor. Let our passion, excitement, and experience help guide you on your own integration journey. And let’s hope I don’t screw up my very important keynote.

Four Warning Signs an Integration Wall is Approaching

The Integration and API Management markets are growing, expanding in both popularity and use. Enterprise App integration will surpass $33b by 2020, and other markets like iPaaS and Data Integration are growing at double-digit CAGRs. Enablers, such as containers and serverless technologies are only accelerating the move toward increased disaggregation of applications.

All seems rosy. And it mostly is.

But with the explosive growth of APIs and endpoints, traditional centralized tools like ESBs will become unsuitable, and simple low-code snap-together tools won’t scale to address the broader scope. We’re potentially about to hit an “integration wall” at high speed.

Consider the following four warning signs – some technical, some process – that I find are beginning to plague the integration market:

1. Waterfall Development for integration is hitting a wall.

Although most code development has shifted to an Agile Development model, the same can’t be said for Integration tools. As the quantity and diversity of endpoints increases, and as Integration projects become more diverse and complex, use of the waterfall model is beginning to slow down integration projects. And with a future where there will be billions of Integratable endpoints, it’s obvious that an Agile Development model for integration will need to become the norm.

2. Existing tools and programming languages aren’t optimized for Integration-at-scale.

Enterprises that currently use low-code, snap-together, centralized integration technologies (including iPaaS) will not be optimized for orchestrating, integrating, observing and governing the expansion of constantly-changing endpoints. Nor are traditional centralized approaches (think: EDI and older ESBs) prepared to handle increasing endpoint scale or diversity. Many of these existing tools are well-adapted for Line-of-Business or Citizen Integrators of relatively small-scale implementations but are far from well adapted for more complex integration-at-scale projects.

3. Current programming languages are not optimized for Integration.

With languages like Java/Spring or JavaScript/Node, developers can engineer flow, but must take responsibility for solving the hard problems of integration. With these languages, developers have to write their own integration logic or use bolt-on frameworks. Clearly a new programming paradigm will be needed long term.

4. The Exploding Endpoint Problem is very real.

As I referenced above, IT is ill-prepared to address the oncoming wave of service disaggregation, the diverse types of APIs, differing sources of service endpoints, challenges from Big Data, and multiple approaches to serverless IT. The industry is about to hit a scale and diversity wall. To wit,

  • 917 apps in use per enterprise (Netscope, 2016)
  • 893-1206 average cloud services used per employee (Kleiner Perkins, April 2017)
  • 19,000 APIs as-of January 2018 (Programmable Web, 2018)

And if you don’t believe those numbers, Matt Eastwood of IDC recently pointed out that the number of containerized services has expanding well beyond where VMs ever were. Yep, billions of programmable endpoints aren’t kid’s stuff.

Where does this leave us?

A new approach to addressing the future of integrating thousands-or millions-of endpoints could lie in a new programming language, Ballerina.

Ballerina is a simple programming language whose syntax and runtime have been optimized for the hard problems of integration. Its focus is integration – bringing concepts, ideas and tools of distributed system integration into the language. Based on the concepts of interactions within sequence diagrams, Ballerina has built-in support for common integration patterns and connectors, including distributed transactions, compensation and circuit breakers. And it supports JSON and XML, making it simple and effective to build robust integration across distributed network endpoints.

So, watch this space for future developments. And in the meantime, beware of the approaching wall.