Tag Archives: Jaggery

WSO2Con Insights – Algar Telecom Delivers Innovation Through Next-Gen Server-Side JavaScript Framework

As telecommunications continue to compete on service, they look at new ways to enrich the customer experience. For Algar Telecom, one of those ways is enabling customers to create their own Web applications using the popular JavaScript language.

At WSO2Con US 2013, Cesar William Alvarenga, front-end engineer at Algar Telecom, described how the company  is taking advantage of Jaggery, WSO2’s server-side JavaScript framework for composing Web applications.

Building on Initial Success

Before describing the company’s use of Jaggery, Alvarenga began by talking about the company’s first project using WSO2 software: Algar Telecom OCS (online charging system). OCS is used to charge customers in real-time, based on their service usage, and all mobile and fixed line traffic will run through this platform. The traffic is passed through WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), transforming the data and integrating with legacy services.

“Today we are processing over 200,000 transactions per day and this number will increase every day,” Alvarenga said. “The performance of the ESB is agreeable and it supports our telecommunication requirements.”

Algar Telecom also uses WSO2 products to support its Coreo platform, which is used to deliver a range of applications. For example, Alvarenga noted, an application could let a user send in the airport and flight number and receive the flight information—all using SMS.

Currently Algar Telecom deploys WSO2 ESB and WSO2 Business Activity Monitor (BAM) across the Coreo platform, Alvarenga explained. WSO2 ESB is used to create an interface between all the Coreo modules and transform the data, while the company uses WSO2 BAM to collect and present all of the platform’s data. The company is now testing Jaggery to facilitate Web app development.

The Jaggery Advantage

“Web developers love JavaScript, but typically must alternate between two languages when they want to build applications on the server side,” Alvarenga said. “Using Jaggery allows our developers to work strictly with JavaScript to build Web applications across the Coreo platform.”

With Jaggery, users can generate HTML and they can exchange messages with JSON, Alvarenga observed; “Another benefit is you can reduce the number of layers in your solution. You can access directly the ESB or database for example, and this helps the developer to build a small solution, accessing directly the main services.”

Working in JavaScript using Jaggery also supports Algar Telecom’s vision of a mobile platform that inherently supports Web-native applications.

“I think the future evolution shows that the mobile platform will support these Web  applications,” Alvarenga said, “Today we have some operating systems that support only this type of application, like Ubuntu phone, HP WebOS. Tizen from Linux, and Firefox OS from Mozilla. Using Jaggery, you have a lot of functionality, so if you know JavaScript, for the server-side application, you don’t have to do much. It’s very easy.

Alvarenga wrapped up by providing a detailed explanation of how Jaggery is used with the Coreo platform—using the Jaggery template to generate HTML for the user, granting access to the user with Jaggery and an OAuth module, executing the application using the WS-Request module, and using the ActiveMQ module to get the result back to the user.

For more information about how Algar Telecom is using Jaggery and other WSO2 solutions to develop web and mobile applications, view Alvarenga’s WSO2Con 2013 presentation here.